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1 Nowhere street / Integrity Inspections Incorporated dba HouseMaster /
Report ID: / Doe
Prepared for Exclusive Use by:
Jane Doe
Address of Property:
1 Nowhere street
Edmonton AB
Date of Service:
2018-12-15
 
Company Providing Service:

AB License 33621

Integrity Inspections Incorporated dba HouseMaster
93 Kaska Road
Sherwood Park, Alberta
T8A 4E7
Report ID: / Doe
INSPECTION INFORMATION
CLIENT:
Jane Doe
PROPERTY ADDRESS:
1 Nowhere street
Edmonton AB
INSPECTION DATE/TIME:
2018-12-15 - 1:00 pm
INSPECTOR:
AB License 33621
INSPECTION COMPANY:
Integrity Inspections Incorporated dba HouseMaster
93 Kaska Road
Sherwood Park, Alberta
T8A 4E7
INSPECTION DETAILS
DESCRIPTION:
Bungalow, Detached Garage

AGE OF HOME:
1971, 47 Years

TYPE OF INSPECTION:
Standard Home Inspection

STATUS OF HOME:
Vacant

WEATHER:
Clear

TEMPERATURE:
0 to +10 C

PEOPLE PRESENT:
Client and Realtor

  
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this report is to render the inspector's professional opinion of the condition of the inspected elements of the referenced property (dwelling or house) on the date of inspection. Such opinions are rendered based on the findings of a standard limited time/scope home inspection performed according to the Terms and Conditions of the Inspection Order Agreement and in a manner consistent with applicable home inspection industry standards. The inspection was limited to the specified, readily visible and accessible installed major structural, mechanical and electrical elements (systems and components) of the house. The inspection does not represent a technically exhaustive evaluation and does not include any engineering, geological, design, environmental, biological, health-related or code compliance evaluations of the house or property. Furthermore, no representations are made with respect to any concealed, latent or future conditions.
The GENERAL INSPECTION LIMITATIONS on the following page provides information regarding home inspections, including various limitations and exclusions, as well as some specific information related to this property. The information contained in this report was prepared exclusively for the named Clients and is not transferable without the expressed consent of the Company. The report, including all Addenda, should be reviewed in its entirety.
REPORT TERMINOLOGY
The following terminology may be used to report conditions observed during the inspection. Additional terms may also be used in the report:
SATISFACTORY - Element was functional at the time of inspection. Element was in working or operating order and its condition was at least sufficient for its minimum required function, although routine maintenance may be needed.
FAIR - Element was functional at time of inspection but has a probability of requiring repair, replacement or other remedial work at any time due to its age, condition, lack of maintenance or other factors. Have element regularly evaluated and anticipate the need to take action.
POOR - Element requires immediate repair, replacement, or other remedial work, or requires evaluation and/or servicing by a qualified specialist.
NOT APPLICABLE - All or individual listed elements were not present, were not observed, were outside the scope of the inspection, and/or were not inspected due to other factors, stated or otherwise.
NOT INSPECTED (NOT RATED) - Element was disconnected or de-energized, was not readily visible or accessible, presented unusual or unsafe conditions for inspection, was outside scope of the inspection, and/or was not inspected due to other factors, stated or otherwise. Independent inspection(s) may be required to evaluate element conditions. If any condition limited accessibility or otherwise impeded completion of aspects of the inspection, including those listed under LIMITATIONS, it is recommended that limiting factors be removed or eliminated and that an inspection of these elements be arranged and completed prior to closing.
IMPORTANT NOTE: All repair needs or recommendations for further evaluation should be addressed prior to closing. It is the client’s responsibility to perform a final inspection to determine the conditions of the dwelling and property at the time of closing. If any decision about the property or its purchase would be affected by any condition or the cost of any required or discretionary remedial work, further evaluation and/or contractor cost quotes should be obtained prior to making any such decisions.
NATURE OF THE FRANCHISE RELATIONSHIP
The Inspection Company ("Company") providing this inspection report is a franchisee of HouseMaster LLC ("Franchisor"). As a franchisee, the Company is an independently owned and operated business that has a license to use the HouseMaster names, marks, and certain methods. In retaining the Company to perform inspection services, the Client acknowledges that Franchisor does not control this Company’s day-to-day activities, is not involved in performing inspections or other services provided by the Company, and is in no way responsible for the Company’s actions. Questions on any issues or concerns should be directed to the listed Company.
GENERAL INSPECTION LIMITATIONS
CONSTRUCTION REGULATIONS - Building codes and construction standards vary regionally. A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of a property for compliance with building or health codes, zoning regulations or other local codes or ordinances. No assessments are made regarding acceptability or approval of any element or component by any agency, or compliance with any specific code or standard. Codes are revised on a periodic basis; consequently, existing structures generally do not meet current code standards, nor is such compliance usually required. Any questions regarding code compliance should be addressed to the appropriate local officials.
HOME MAINTENANCE - All homes require regular and preventive maintenance to maximize the economic life spans of elements and to minimize unanticipated repair or replacement needs. Annual maintenance costs may run 1 to 3% (or more) of the sales price of a house depending on age, design, and/or the degree of prior maintenance. Every homeowner should develop a preventive maintenance program and budget for normal maintenance and unexpected repair expenses. Remedial work should be performed by a specialist in the appropriate field following local requirements and best practices.
ENVIRONMENTAL AND MOLD ISSUES (AND EXCLUSIONS) - The potential health effects from exposure to many elements found in building materials or in the air, soil, water in and/or around any house are varied. A home inspection does not include the detection, identification or analysis of any such element or related concerns such as, but not limited to, mold, allergens, radon, formaldehyde, asbestos, lead, electromagnetic fields, carbon monoxide, insecticides, refrigerants, and fuel oils. Furthermore, no evaluations are performed to determine the effectiveness of any system designed to prevent or remove any elements (e.g., water filters or radon mitigation). An environmental health specialist should be contacted for evaluation of any potential health or environmental concerns. Review additional information on MOLD/MICROBIAL ELEMENTS below.
AESTHETIC CONSIDERATIONS - A standard building inspection does not include a determination of all potential concerns or conditions that may be present or occur in the future including aesthetic/cosmetic considerations or issues (appearances, surface flaws, finishes, furnishings, odors, etc.).
DESIGN AND ADEQUACY ISSUES - A standard home inspection does not include any element design or adequacy evaluations including seismic or high-wind concerns, soil bearing, energy efficiencies, or energy conservation measures. It also does not address in any way the function or suitability of floor plans or other design features. Furthermore, no determinations are made regarding product defects notices, safety recalls, or other similar manufacturer or public/private agency warnings related to any material or element that may be present in any house or on any property.
AGE ESTIMATIONS AND DESIGN LIFE RANGES - Any age estimations represent the inspector's opinion as to the approximate age of components. Estimations may be based on numerous factors including, but not limited to, appearance and owner comment. Design life ranges represent the typical economic service life for elements of similar design, quality and type, as measured from the time of original construction or installation. Design life ranges do not take into consideration abnormal, unknown, or discretionary factors, and are not a prediction of future service life. Stated age or design life ranges are given in "years," unless otherwise noted, and are provided for general guidance purposes only. Obtain independent verification if knowledge of the specific age or future life of any element is desired or required.
ELEMENT DESCRIPTIONS - Any descriptions or representations of element material, type, design, size, dimensions, etc., are based primarily on visual observation of inspected or representative components. Owner comment, element labeling, listing data, and rudimentary measurements may also be considered in an effort to describe an element. However, there is no guarantee of the accuracy of any material or product descriptions listed in this report; other or additional materials may be present. Independent evaluations and/or testing should be arranged if verification of any element's makeup, design, or dimension is needed. Any questions arising from the use of any particular terminology or nomenclature in this report should be addressed prior to closing.
REMEDIAL WORK - Quotes should be obtained prior to closing from qualified (knowledgeable and licensed as required) specialists/contractors to determine actual repair/replacement costs for any element or condition requiring attention. Any cost estimates provided with a home inspection, whether oral or written, only represent an approximation of possible costs. Cost estimates do not reflect all possible remedial needs or costs for the property; latent concerns or consequential damage may exist. If the need for remedial work develops or is uncovered after the inspection, prior to performing any repairs contact the Inspection Company to arrange a re-inspection to assess conditions Aside from basic maintenance suitable for the average homeowner, all repairs or other remedial work should be performed by a specialist in the appropriate field following local requirements and best practices.
SELLER DISCLOSURE - This report is not a substitute for Seller Disclosure. A Property History Questionnaire form may be provided with this report to help obtain background information on the property in the event a full Seller Disclosure form is not available. The buyer should review this form and/or the Seller Disclosure with the owner prior to closing for clarification or resolution of any questionable items. A final buyer inspection of the house (prior to or at the time of closing) is also recommended.
WOOD-DESTROYING INSECTS/ORGANISMS - In areas subject to wood-destroying insect activity, it is advisable to obtain a current wood-destroying insect and organism report on the property from a qualified specialist, whether or not it is required by a lender. A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of the nature or status of any insect infestation, treatment, or hidden damage, nor does it cover issues related to other house pests or nuisances or subsequent damage.
ELEMENTS NOT INSPECTED - Any element or component not evaluated as part of this inspection should be inspected prior to closing. Either make arrangements with the appropriate tradesman or contact the Inspection Company to arrange an inspection when all elements are ready for inspection.
HOUSE ORIENTATION - Location descriptions/references are provided for general guidance only and represent orientations based on a view facing the front of the house from the outside. Any references using compass bearings are only approximations. If there are any questions, obtain clarification prior to closing.
CONDOMINIUMS - The Inspection of condominium/cooperative do not include exteriors/ typical common elements, unless otherwise noted. Contact the association/management for information on common element conditions, deeds, and maintenance responsibilities.
MOLD AND MICROBIAL ELEMENTS / EXCLUSIONS
The purpose and scope of a standard home inspection does not include the detection, identification or assessment of fungi and other biological contaminants, such as molds, mildew, wood-destroying fungi (decay), bacteria, viruses, pollens, animal dander, pet or vermin excretions, dust mites and other insects. These elements contain/carry microbial particles that can be allergenic, infectious or toxic to humans, especially individuals with asthma and other respiratory conditions or sensitivity to chemical or biological contaminants. Wood-destroying fungi, some molds, and other contaminants can also cause property damage. One particular biological contamination concern is mold. Molds are present everywhere. Any type of water leakage, moisture condition or moisture-related damage that exists over a period of time can lead to the growth of potentially harmful mold(s). The longer the condition(s) exists, the greater the probability of mold growth. There are many different types of molds; most molds do not create a health hazard, but others are toxic.
Indoor mold represents the greatest concern as it can affect air quality and the health of individuals exposed to it. Mold can be found in almost all homes. Factors such as the type of construction materials and methods, occupant lifestyles, and the amount of attention given to house maintenance also contribute to the potential for molds. Indoor mold contamination begins when spores produced by mold spread by air movement or other means to an area conducive to mold growth. Mold spores can be found in the air, carpeting, insulation, walls and ceilings of all buildings. But mold spores only develop into an active mold growth when exposed to moisture. The sources of moisture in a house are numerous and include water leakage or seepage from plumbing fixtures, appliances, roof openings, construction defects (e.g., EIFS wall coverings or missing flashing) and natural catastrophes like floods or hurricanes. Excessive humidity or condensation caused by faulty fuel-burning equipment, improper venting systems, and/or inadequate ventilation provisions are other sources of indoor moisture. By controlling leakage, humidity and indoor air quality, the potential for mold contamination can be reduced. To prevent the spread of mold, immediate remediation of any water leakage or moisture problems is critical. For information on mold testing or assessments, contact a qualified mold specialist.
Neither the evaluation of the presence or potential for mold growth, nor the identification of specific molds and their effects, fall within the scope of a standard home inspection. Accordingly, the Inspection Company assumes no responsibility or liability related to the discovery or presence of any molds, their removal, or the consequences whether property or health-related.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS

Seasonal/Weather Factors - Due to seasonal factors or weather conditions, evaluation of some elements may have been severely restricted or not possible. Client should assess the level of concern that may exist due to such limitations and arrange additional inspections when conditions permit or otherwise address limitations prior to closing. If there are any questions on the need for further inspections or other work, contact the local HouseMaster office, fees will apply.

Pictures in Report - Any pictures (photographs, graphics, or images) included in or provided in conjunction with this Inspection Report generally portray overviews of certain elements, depict specific conditions or defects described in report comments, or are used for orientation purposes.  Pictures provided do not necessarily reflect all conditions or issues that need attention or may otherwise be a concern. The inclusion or exclusion of any picture is not in anyway designed to highlight or diminish the significance or severity of any defect or condition, except as may be described in the Inspection Report. The report must be read in its entirety for pertinent information. If other pictures of the property were taken by the inspector and not included in the report, they were either destroyed or not included because they were poor quality, redundant, or superfluous images.

Remedial Work and Renovations - A home inspection is an evaluation of the condition of certain elements of a property as they exist at the time of inspection. There are many issues associated with the need or desire to repair, replace, renovate, or upgrade house components, including product options, quality of materials, compatibility with existing or adjacent materials, building codes and local ordinances, demolition and disposal requirements, and installation methods. Any or all of these factors, as well as others not listed, may significantly affect the cost of remedial work or renovations, including the need for related alterations or the upgrading of new or existing components. These factors may also affect the ability or feasibility of completing the intended work.

Secondary Suite - This inspection does not address all the requirements for a secondary suite. The Alberta government has a website about the standards for a secondary suites. Client is advised to visit www.municipalaffairs.alberta.ca/cp_secondary_suites. Client is also advised to check with the local municipality for any other regulations that may apply.

Vacant Property - It is often not possible to completely evaluate certain elements in a new structure or if a house has been vacant for any length of time. For example, a drain leak in a wall or blockage in an underground waste line may not become apparent until after the inspection. Therefore, anticipate the possibility of such latent defects with subsequent use of the house and/or systems. Furthermore, a thorough pre-closing inspection is recommended.


Report ID: / Doe
1.  ROOFING
The inspection of roofs and rooftop elements is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein; elements and areas concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected.  This inspection does not include chimney flues and flue liners, or ancillary components or systems such as lightning protection, solar panels, and similar elements, unless specifically stated. Element descriptions are provided for general information purposes only; the verification of roofing materials, roof age, and/or compliance with manufacturer installation requirements is not within the scope of a standard home inspection. Issues related to roof or roofing conditions may also be covered under other headings in this report, including the ATTIC section.
ROOF STYLE:
Moderate Slope
MATERIAL:
Asphalt/Fibreglass Shingle
ESTIMATED AGE:
11 to 15 Years
DESIGN LIFE:
15 to 20 years
LOCATION:
Whole House
INSPECTION METHOD:
Ladder At Eaves
Ground
CHIMNEYS/VENTS:
B-Vent
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Snow Cover
 
S F P NA NI  
        1.0 ROOFING
(1) See Home Owner Information Guide - Ice Dams.
(2) Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise. Shingles appeared to be in good condition on the south side at the eaves where the inspector brushed away snow and ice.
        1.1 ROOF VALLEYS
        1.2 CHIMNEYS / VENTS
Snow cover prevents close inspection. Viewed from ladder at the eaves. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise.
        1.3 EXPOSED FLASHING
Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise.
        1.4 VENTILATION COVERS
        1.5 PLUMBING STACKS
The plumbing vent stacks are low, typical of the age of the house,  and may be subject to blockage with debris and snow. Blockage can affect fixture drainage; Consider extending the stacks.
        1.6 RAIN GUTTERS / EAVE TROUGHS
(1) All gutters should be checked for damage, blockage, or overflow on a regular basis. Overflow may cause water penetration and/or damage to roof sheathing fascia, soffits, etc. Gutter guards may help in cases where leaves and other debris routinely accumulate in a short period of time.
(2) Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise. No concerns noted where visible.
        1.7 DOWNSPOUTS / ROOF DRAINS
        1.8 FASCIA / SOFFITS
Fascia/soffit aluminum clad, inspection of underlying wood was not possible or performed.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
1.0(2) ROOFING (Picture 1)
1.5 PLUMBING STACKS (Picture 1)
1.6(1) RAIN GUTTERS / EAVE TROUGHS (Picture 1)
NOTE: All roofs have a finite life and will require replacement at some point. In the interim, the seals at all roof penetrations and flashings, and the watertightness of rooftop elements, should be checked periodically and repaired or maintained as required. Any roof defect can result in leakage, mould, and subsequent damage. Conditions such as hail damage or manufacturing defects or whether the proper nailing methods or underlayment were used are not readily detectible during a home inspection. Gutters (eave troughs) and downspouts (leaders) will require regular cleaning and maintenance. All chimneys and vents should be checked periodically. In general, fascia and soffit areas are not readily accessible for inspection; these components are prone to decay, insect, and pest damage, particularly with roof or gutter leakage. If any roof deficiencies are reported, a qualified roofer or the appropriate specialist should be contacted to determine what remedial action is required. If the roof inspection was restricted or limited due to roof height, weather conditions, or other factors, arrangements should be made to have the roof inspected by a qualified roofer, particularly if the roofing is older or its age is unknown.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Roof Systems -

The watertightness of a roofing system is dependent on the proper installation of the roofing material and underlayment, its physical condition, and the proper function of all flashings (metal or other membrane installed at protrusions through the roof, such as vent pipes, skylights and valleys). While general roofing conditions were reported, this report is not a guarantee the roof is or will be watertight or leak free.

Inspection Limitations -

The evaluation of a roof is primarily a visual assessment based on general roofing appearances. The verification of actual roofing materials, installation methods or roof age is generally not possible. Conditions such as hail damage or the lack of underlayment may not be readily detectible and may result in latent concerns. If the inspection was restricted to viewing from the ground and/or was affected by weather conditions or other limitations, a roofer's assessment would be advisable, particularly if the roofing is old or age is unknown.

Ice Dams -

Ice/snow accumulation at the roof edge can cause leaks and consequential damage. The occurrence of ice dams is usually unpredictable and may only occur with certain roof designs or weather conditions.

Roof Underlayment -

Manufacturers typically specify the use of a roof underlayment (base). In some areas, however, roofing may be installed without the use of an underlayment due to local practice or for other reasons. Its absence does not necessarily affect the service life of the roofing; however, the lack of an underlayment means there is no secondary barrier should water or ice backup occur, or if the roofing itself is damaged or missing.

Roof Flashings/Seal -

Initial or recurring roof leakage is often due to inadequate or damaged flashing. All flashings should be checked periodically or if leakage occurs repair or seal as needed.

Ice Dams/Eave Protection -

The generally accepted approach to minimizing ice dam concerns and/or backup at eaves is to provide adequate attic ventilation and insulation and eave protection, either a special membrane or flashing. Eave protection should always be used in cold climates prone to ice dam problems. Eave barriers should be placed under the roofing at the eave areas and extend a suitable distance up the roof and inside the exterior wall line. The presence and effectiveness of eave protection cannot be observed in most completed installations.

Roof Drainage -

Unless otherwise noted, the assessment of gutter and downspout conditions are limited to their physical/material condition. The adequacy of water flow under normal rainfall or storm conditions cannot be determined during a standard inspection.  All gutters and downspouts must be checked and cleaned on a regular basis; any build-up or blockage, including that in underground lines can lead to overflow, leakage, and other detrimental conditions that could result in water intrusion or otherwise affect the structure or foundation.

Roofing Appearance -

Conditions such as light surface mildew (fungus) buildup on the roofing, slight granule loss, uneven/irregular coloring, (shingle shading), and similar relatively superficial conditions generally do not affect roof function. Maintain/ repair as desired. Heavy mildew/fungus buildup may indicate a ventilation concern and/or lead to more serious concerns related to mould.

Hail Storms -

Conditions such as hail damage, manufacturing defects, or the lack of roof underlayment or proper nailing methods are not readily detectible during a home inspection, but may result in latent concerns. Hail can damage a roof in imperceptible ways; the evidence or extent of damage may not become apparent until some time in the future. If hail damage has occurred, as the roof ages it may loose granules prematurely or exhibit other signs of wear/damage. Not all roofs affected by hail need to be replaced; however, the service life of the roofing may be less than the typical design life; recommend questioning the home owner and/or local building officials for information on any known storms that may have passed through and adversely affected the roof. Address insurance coverage issues as well. Recommend obtaining a roofer's opinion if hail damage is suspected.

Plumbing Vents/Stacks -

The flashing/boot seal at plumbing vents are prone to leakage. All vent pipe flashings should be checked periodically and should be repaired and/or sealed as needed. Vent stacks must have adequate clearance from windows and other roof or wall openings or vents. Extending the vent may prevent detrimental conditions.

Chimneys/Vents -

Chimney and vent evaluations are based on external conditions only. Internal conditions, design, and venting adequacy were not evaluated unless specifically indicated. A periodic check of all chimneys/vents is advisable as a precautionary measure. A chimney sweep is often qualified to assess/maintain chimney/vent interiors.

Ancillary Systems -

This inspection does not include evaluation of ancillary components or systems such as lightning protection, antennas, solar panels, site lighting, security systems, patio covers or other similar exterior roof or exterior elements.

Gutters/Downspouts -

The need for gutters and downspouts will vary with house/roof design, locale and surface drainage conditions.  All gutters should be checked for damage, blockage, or overflow on a regular basis. Overflow may cause water penetration and/or damage to roof sheathing fascia, soffits, etc. Gutter guards may help in cases where leaves and other debris routinely accumulate in a short period of time. If not present, consider the benefits to be gained from proper control of roof run-off and diversion away from foundation.

Gutter Maintainance -

All gutters should be checked for damage, blockage, or overflow on a regular basis. Overflow may cause water penetration and/or damage to roof sheathing fascia, soffits, etc. Gutter guards may help in cases where leaves and other debris routinely accumulate in a short period of time.

Splash Blocks/Extensions -

To minimize water ponding at the foundation and the potential for interior water penetration, downspout extensions or splash blocks should be utilized at the termination points of all downspouts/roof drains. Maintain a positive slope away from the house and discharge downspouts a reasonable distance away from the foundation.

Asphalt/Fiberglass Shingles -

Most newer asphalt roofing products are reinforced with glass fibers to improve the strength of the base felt. Some of these products, however, are susceptible to manufacturing defects that may or may not affect roof function. The manufacturer or qualified roofer should be consulted if there are any reported or suspected concerns.



Report ID: / Doe
2.  EXTERIOR ELEMENTS
Inspection of exterior elements is limited to readily visible and accessible surfaces of the house envelope and connected appurtenances as listed herein; elements concealed from view by any means cannot be inspected. All exterior elements are subject to the effects of long-term exposure and sudden damage from ongoing and ever-changing weather conditions. Style and material descriptions are based on predominant/representative components and are provided for general information purposes only; specific types and/or material make-up material is not verified. Neither the efficiency nor integrity of insulated window units can be determined. Furthermore, the presence/condition of accessories such as storms, screens, shutters, locks and other attachments or decorative items is not included, unless specifically noted. Additional information on exterior elements, particularly windows/doors and the foundation may be provided under other headings in this report, including the INTERIOR and FOUNDATION/SUBSTRUCTURE sections.
SIDING:
Stucco
Metal
PORCHES/DECKS:
Wood Frame Deck w/ Wood Flooring
Deck Location: Rear of House
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Snow Cover
Snow Cover around Foundation
Inaccesible Deck Understructure
S F P NA NI  
        2.0 SIDING
(1) Recommend maintaining seals at exterior penetrations reduce the potential for water infiltration and and insect problems.
(2) A few hairline cracks were observed. Monitor for cracks becoming larger and repair as required.
        2.1 WINDOWS
        2.2 ENTRY DOORS
No deadbolt lock observed at the rear door. Consider installing a deadbolt lock for improved security.
        2.3 STAIRS / STOOPS
        2.4 DECK(S)
(1) Inspection based on visible areas only. Structure of deck not visible and was not inspected.
(2) Ground level decks are subject to earlier deterioration and should be maintained as required.
(3) Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise.
        2.5 RAILINGS
        2.6 FOUNDATION SURFACE
(1) Vertical cracks at one or more locations observed. Vertical cracks are not normally structural concerns; recommend sealing or repair to reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.
(2) Main beam popping  observed on the East and West sides. Recommend further investigation to check for foundation cracking at the beam pockets; this will require exposing the foundation wall by removing some finishes at the exterior or interior. Cracking at the beam pockets should be addressed by a foundation repair specialist. The foundation coating (parging) should be repaired to prevent water entry.

The foundation coating  has been repaired on the East (driveway) side. If possible, ask the current owner for historical information in case the foundation wall has been examined previously.

(3) Cracking was observed near the South-West corner. Corner cracking may indicate a structural concern. Recommend further investigation by digging below the parging to view the foundation wall. Spreading or displacement at cracks or cracks wider than 1/4 inch should be addressed by a foundation repair specialist.
        2.7 ELECTRIC / GFCI
(1) See Home Owner Information Guide - Common Electrical Problems
(2) The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter  helps to prevent electrocution. If the GFCI circuity within the outlet detects a current leak it will shut down the receptacle and other receptacles downstream to prevent electrocution. (If the GFCI is in the panel the entire circuit will shut down.) Please note that GFCI’s are designed to protect people, not devices.
(3) The green plug in the photos is a testing device.
(4) Standard receptacle observed; recommend installing GFCI protected receptacle(s). GFCIs have been required for exterior receptacle outlets installed within 2.5 meters from grade (8 ft.) for many years and they are a recommended safety improvement for all homes.
        2.8 EXTERIOR FAUCETS
(1) Due to temperature below the freezing point no inspection was possible or performed; recommend further evaluation when temperatures are above freezing.
(2) Frost proof hose bibbs observed. Homeowner should always remove hoses from faucets in cold weather; failing to do so can lead to breakage at hoses, faucets and water pipes resulting in water infiltration and damage.
(3) Non-frost proof hose bibbs observed. Winterize by closing interior shutoffs prior to freeze-up and open faucets to allow drainage. Water expands when freezing and can exert enough force to break pipes. Check carefully for leakage in basement when faucet is first used.
(4) Add-on vacuum breakers are available to upgrade older faucets. Vacuum breakers are a type of backflow preventer that prevents water standing in hoses from being siphoned back into the house and contaminating potable water.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
2.2 ENTRY DOORS (Picture 1)
2.4(1) DECK(S) (Picture 1)
2.6(1) FOUNDATION SURFACE (Picture 1)
2.6(1) FOUNDATION SURFACE (Picture 2)
2.6(2) FOUNDATION SURFACE (Picture 1)
2.6(2) FOUNDATION SURFACE (Picture 2)
2.6(3) FOUNDATION SURFACE (Picture 1)
2.6(3) FOUNDATION SURFACE (Picture 2)
2.7(2) ELECTRIC / GFCI (Picture 1)
2.7(4) ELECTRIC / GFCI (Picture 1)
2.8(2) EXTERIOR FAUCETS (Picture 1)
2.8(3) EXTERIOR FAUCETS (Picture 1)
2.8(3) EXTERIOR FAUCETS (Picture 2)
2.8(3) EXTERIOR FAUCETS (Picture 3)
2.8(4) EXTERIOR FAUCETS (Picture 1)
NOTE: All surfaces of the envelope of the house should be inspected at least semi-annually, and maintained as needed. Any exterior element defect can result in leakage and/or subsequent damage. Exterior wood elements and wood composites are particularly susceptible to water-related damage, including decay, insect infestation, and mould. The use of proper treated lumber or alternative products may help minimize these concerns, but will not eliminate them altogether. While some areas of decay or damage may be reported, additional areas of concern may exist, subsequently develop, or be discovered during repair or maintenance work. Should you wish advice on any new or uncovered area of deterioration, please contact the Inspection Company. Periodic caulking/resealing of all gaps and joints will be required. Insulated window/door units are subject to seal failure, which could ultimately affect the transparency and/or function of the window. Lead-based paints were commonly used on older homes; independent inspection is required if confirmation or a risk assessment is desired.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Stairs/Decks/Porches -

Exterior stairs, rails, porches, etc., require regular maintenance to prevent damage or hazardous conditions. If rails are not present on any stairs or elevated structure, it is recommended they be added for improved safety. Do not overload a deck with too many people.

Windows and Doors -

Storms, screens, safety glazing, locks and other attachments are generally not inspected unless otherwise noted. Comments on storms generally are limited to surface conditions; function and operation are not evaluated. An inventory of storms/screens should be taken to confirm desired coverage exists and/or storage locations.

Window/Door Seals -

Replacement of insulated glass windows or doors is usually required to correct failed or defective vacuum seals. Fortunately, the insulation value is usually not significantly reduced. Replacement time frame may be discretionary; however, conditions will gradually worsen with time.

Drip Caps/Flashings -

The trim/siding joint above windows and doors and at horizontal trim must be kept well sealed to minimize leakage or decay. If drip caps or suitable flashings do not exist, they should be added or regular caulking/sealing will be required. Hidden damage may exist if prior leakage occurred.

Exterior Electric -

Due to weathering factors and the potential hazards of exterior wiring, precaution must be used for the installation and maintenance of electrical components. Any damaged components should be corrected immediately. Recommend adding Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter (GFCI) protection if not present.

Storms/Screens -

An inventory of storms/screens should be taken to confirm desired coverage exists and/or storage locations. Any loose, damaged or missing storms or screens should be repaired as desired, or if health concerns or other hazards exist.



Report ID: / Doe
3.  SITE ELEMENTS
Inspection of site elements is primarily intended to address the condition of listed, readily visible and accessible elements immediately adjacent to or surrounding the house for conditions and issues that may have an impact on the house. Elements and areas concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected. Neither the inspection nor report includes any geological surveys, soil compaction surveys, ground testing, or evaluation of the effects of, or potential for, earth movement such as earthquakes, landslides, or sinking, rising or shifting for any reason. Information on local soil conditions and issues should be obtained from local officials and/or a qualified specialist prior to closing. In addition to the stated limitations on the inspection of site elements, a standard home inspection does not include evaluation of elements such as underground drainage systems, site lighting, irrigation systems, barbecues, sheds, detached structures, fencing, privacy walls, docks, seawalls, pools, spas and other recreational items.  Additional information related to site element conditions may be found under other headings in this report, including the FOUNDATION/SUBSTRUCTURE and WATER PENETRATION sections.
PATIOS:
Type: Concrete
WALKWAYS:
Concrete
DRIVEWAY:
Concrete
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Snow Cover
   
S F P NA NI  
        3.0 PATIO(S)
(1) View limited by snow cover; recommend checking for cracking and slope when visible to ensure water drains away from foundation. Recommend sealing any cracks as required.
(2)

The significance of spalling and/or cracking of concrete or other walkway surfaces will depend on the location of the damage and its severity. In some cases function may not be affected and minor repair or surface sealing may minimize further deterioration. Replacement of affected areas will be required if there is any significant displacement or damage.

(3) Patio settled toward the house observed. All patio surfaces should be constructed and maintained so that they slope away from the foundation and water runs off freely; recommend keeping free and clear of snow and water and maintain the sealant at the foundation; consider mud jacking, re-grading, or replacement to minimize the potential for water infiltration.
        3.1 DRIVEWAY
(1) Ice cover limits evaluation to visible areas only; recommend checking for cracking and slope when visible.
(2) Spalling and cracking observed; the significance of spalling and cracking of asphalt, concrete or other driveway surfaces will depend on the location of the damage and its severity. In some cases function may not be affected and spot repair and/or surface sealing may minimize further deterioration and extend its service life. Replacement of affected areas may be required if there is any significant displacement or damage.
        3.2 WALKWAYS
Spalling and cracking observed; the significance of spalling and/or cracking of concrete or other walkway surfaces will depend on the location of the damage and its severity. In some cases function may not be affected and minor repair or surface sealing may minimize further deterioration. Replacement of affected areas may be required if there is any significant displacement or damage.
        3.3 WINDOW WELLS
Recommend keeping window wells free and clear of soil and debris to ensure proper operation and drainage.
        3.4 GROUND SLOPE AT FOUNDATION
(1) Raised garden beds tend to be relatively flat and receive irrigation, water ponding on the surface and saturating the soil below can result in water intrusion and foundation damage. Ensure that ground surface slopes away from the house and consider plantings that require little or no irrigation.
(2) A sloped surface is required to effectively drain water away from the foundation walls including areas under steps and decks. This will greatly reduce the risk of surface water from rainfall and snowmelt causing damage to the foundation and entering the basement.
        3.5 SITE GRADING
Snow limits assessment of grade and drainage of the lot around house; recommend further evaluation when clear.  A positive slope should be maintained to move water away from foundation to reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
3.0(3) PATIO(S) (Picture 1)
3.1(1) DRIVEWAY (Picture 1)
3.1(2) DRIVEWAY (Picture 1)
3.1(2) DRIVEWAY (Picture 2)
3.3 WINDOW WELLS (Picture 1)
3.3 WINDOW WELLS (Picture 2)
3.4(1) GROUND SLOPE AT FOUNDATION (Picture 1)
3.4(2) GROUND SLOPE AT FOUNDATION (Picture 1)
NOTE:  Site conditions are subject to sudden change with exposure to rain, wind, temperature changes, and other climatic factors. Roof drainage systems and site/foundation grading and drainage must be maintained to provide adequate water control. Improper/inadequate grading or drainage and other soil/site factors can cause or contribute to foundation movement or failure, water infiltration into the house interior, and/or mould concerns. Independent evaluation by an engineer or soils specialist is required to evaluate geological or soil-related concerns. Houses built on expansive clays or uncompacted fill, on hillsides, along bodies of water, or in low-lying areas are especially prone to structural concerns. All improved surfaces such as patios, walks, and driveways must also be maintained to drain water away from the foundation. Any reported or subsequently occurring deficiencies must be investigated and corrected to prevent recurring or escalating problems. Independent evaluation of ancillary and site elements by a qualified service person is recommended prior to closing.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Site Elements -

While informational comments may be made related to the condition of certain site elements, the primary intent of inspection of any site element is limited to evaluation relative to its effect on the building.

Geological Factors -

This report does not include evaluation of any soils or geological conditions/concerns. Construction on certain soils, particularly expansive clays, fill soils, hillside and waterfront areas, necessitate special design consideration. Evaluation of these factors, or the need for them, is beyond the scope of this inspection. Pertinent information should be obtained from local officials and/or a qualified specialist prior to closing, particularly if any concerns are detected or if home is in a detrimental soils area.

Site Maintainance -

Any grading deficiencies should be corrected. Suitable drainage and ground cover should be added if needed to prevent further concerns. Maintaining grading and lot drainage are considered regular maintenance items.

Grading and Drainage -

To reduce the amount of water run-off or possibility of water penetration and/or structural concerns, provide proper contouring (grading) along the foundation and where needed on the site. Houses on hills or in low-lying areas will be prone to drainage concerns. Improper/inadequate grading and/or drainage can cause/contribute to foundation movement and/or failure. Deficiencies must be corrected to prevent problems.

Grading & Draining Provisions -

Neither the condition nor adequacy of any underground piping or site drainage systems can be determined as part of a standard home inspection. All drains must be regularly cleared and maintained in order to ensure adequate water run-off and discharge to reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage. Any depressions or negatively graded areas should be corrected/improved to help direct any roof or surface run-off away from the foundation. Maintenance of a suitable ground cover is also advised. Improper/inadequate grading and/or drainage can cause/contribute to foundation movement and/or failure. Deficiencies must be corrected to prevent problems. Periodic re-grading may be required.

Drainage From Surfaces -

All improved surfaces such as patios, walks and driveways should be constructed and maintained so that they slope away from the foundation. Mud jacking and/or sealing may be adequate to correct minor drainage concerns; however, replacement may be required for proper correction in some cases.

Concrete Surfaces -

The significance of spalling and/or cracking of concrete or other surfaces will depend on the location of the damage and its severity. In some cases, function may not be affected and minor repair or surface sealing may minimize further deterioration. Replacement of affected areas may be required if there is any significant displacement or damage.  Maintain as required or correct to eliminate any trip hazard that may exist or develop.

Soil Conditions -

Soils such as expansive clays may require regular maintenance programs to ensure stable soil moisture levels and minimize movement of any structural component. If fill was used, the soil may continue to compact over time and affect the structure

Fencing/Site Walls/Sheds -

The inspection of fencing, site walls, and sheds is not included in the scope of a standard home inspection. Wood components are prone to decay and insect damage. Advise a check of these elements for current conditions and assurance of personal acceptability.

Vegetation/Landscaping -

The site vegetation and landscaping should be maintained to prevent damage to the structure. Carefully remove any overgrowth to check for damage.

Ancillary Elements -

A standard inspection does not include evaluation of elements such as site lighting, irrigation systems, barbecues, sheds, outbuildings, fencing, privacy walls, docks, seawalls, pools, spas and other recreational or site elements. Evaluation of these elements prior to closing would be advisable.



Report ID: / Doe
4.  DETACHED GARAGE
Inspection of the garage is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein.  Elements and areas concealed from view cannot be inspected.  More so than most other areas of a house, garages tend to be filled with storage and other items that restrict visibility and hide potential concerns, such as water damage or insect infestation.  A standard home inspection does not include an evaluation of the adequacy of the fire separation assemblies between the house and garage, or whether such assemblies comply with any specific requirements.  Inspection of garage doors with connected automatic door operator is limited to a check of operation utilizing hard-wired controls only.  Additional information related to garage elements and conditions may be found under other headings in this report, including ROOFS and EXTERIOR ELEMENTS.
GARAGE DESCRIPTION:
Type: Two Car
GARAGE ROOF:
Type: Moderate Slope
Material: Asphalt/Fibreglass
Est. Age: Not determined
Design Life: 15-20 Years
Insp. Method: Ladder at Edge
Special Limitations: Snow Cover
GARAGE WALLS:
Finish: Drywall
Insulation: Observed - Extent Indeterminable
Vapor Retarder: Not Determined - Finished Walls
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Storage/Belongings
Finish Materials
Snow Cover
   
S F P NA NI  
        4.0 ROOFING
Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Curling and erosion of shingles was observed on the West side where the inspector cleared snow and ice. Anticipate the need to replace the shingles. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise.
        4.1 ATTIC VENTILATION
Attic is unfinished / uninsulated. Ventilation provisions will need to be installed if attic is to be finished in the future.
        4.2 FASCIA / SOFFITS
Flaking paint and loose soffits observed. Repair as required to prevent further deterioration and pest entry.
        4.3 RAIN GUTTERS / EAVE TROUGHS
(1) All gutters should be checked for damage, blockage, or overflow on a regular basis. Overflow may cause water penetration and/or damage to roof sheathing fascia, soffits, etc. Gutter guards may help in cases where leaves and other debris routinely accumulate in a short period of time.
(2) Snow/frost limits view and access,  recommend further evaluation when clear and accessible.
        4.4 DOWNSPOUTS / ROOF DRAINS
Short downspout at the South-West corner was likely for a rain barrel. Recommend an extension to direct water away from the foundation.
        4.5 SIDING
(1) Recommend maintaining seals at exterior penetrations reduce the potential for water infiltration and and insect problems.
(2) Cracked and damaged parging observed. Recommend repair to prevent water damage to wood sheathing and framing.
        4.6 GROUND SLOPE AT FOUNDATION
Snow limits assessment of grade and drainage around house observed; recommend further evaluation when clear.  A positive slope should be maintained to move water away from foundation to reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.
        4.7 EXPOSED FRAMING
        4.8 FLOOR SLAB
Cracking and settlement of floor slab observed with indications that water has accumulated in the corners. The corners have been capped with concrete topping which likely will deteriorate with time. Consider further investigation by a concrete repair specialist.
        4.9 FOUNDATION
The floor slab likely is the foundation on this type of structure.
        4.10 WALLS & CEILING
(1) Cracks and nail pops in wall/ceiling surfaces due to construction methods, material, framing movement, and other factors observed. Minor surface conditions can generally be repaired, but the need for periodic repair should be anticipated. If defects are large, recurring, or appear to increase in magnitude, there is likely an underlying structural concern that may need to be evaluated.
(2) Signs of water damage and possible mould was observed in the corners where the concrete slab has settled. Recommend further investigation and repair to prevent further deterioration.
        4.11 WINDOW(S)
        4.12 SERVICE DOOR(S)
Service door deadbolt would not unlock. Recommend further investigation and repair as required.
        4.13 VEHICLE DOOR(S)
Door is functional  but rated FAIR due to age. Wood deterioration, weathered frame and loose trim was observed. Repair / replace as desired.
        4.14 DOOR OPERATOR(S)
(1) Electric-eye style sensor observed. Door correctly reversed when beam was interrupted; recommend checking for proper function regularly.
(2) Door operator correctly reversed when downward travel was resisted; see manufacturer's recommendations for performing periodic safety checks.
        4.15 ELECTRICAL
Storage limits access to some receptacles, spot checked only.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
4.0 ROOFING (Picture 1)
4.0 ROOFING (Picture 2)
4.1 ATTIC VENTILATION (Picture 1)
4.2 FASCIA / SOFFITS (Picture 1)
4.2 FASCIA / SOFFITS (Picture 2)
4.4 DOWNSPOUTS / ROOF DRAINS (Picture 1)
4.5(2) SIDING (Picture 1)
4.5(2) SIDING (Picture 2)
4.8 FLOOR SLAB (Picture 1)
4.10(2) WALLS & CEILING (Picture 1)
4.13 VEHICLE DOOR(S) (Picture 1)
4.13 VEHICLE DOOR(S) (Picture 2)
4.14(1) DOOR OPERATOR(S) (Picture 1)
4.14(1) DOOR OPERATOR(S) (Picture 2)
NOTE: Any areas obstructed at the time of inspection should be cleared and checked prior to closing.  The integrity of the fire-separation wall/ceiling assemblies generally required between the house and garage, including any house-to-garage doors and attic hatches, must be maintained for proper protection.  Review manufacturer use and safety instructions for garage doors and automatic door operators.  All doors and door operators should be tested and serviced on a regular basis to prevent personal injury or equipment damage. Any malfunctioning doors or door operators should be repaired prior to using. Door operators without auto-reverse capabilities should be repaired or upgraded for safety.  The storage of combustibles in a garage creates a potential hazard, including the possible ignition of vapors, and should be restricted.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Roof Inspection Limitations -

The evaluation of a roof is primarily a visual assessment based on general roofing appearances. The verification of actual roofing materials, installation methods or roof age is generally not possible. Conditions such as hail damage or the lack of underlayment may not be readily detectible and may result in latent concerns. If the inspection was restricted to viewing from the ground and/or was affected by weather conditions or other limitations, a roofer's assessment would be advisable, particularly if the roofing is old or age is unknown.

Overhead Door Operator -

The inspection of any door operator is limited to a check of operation utilizing hard-wired controls. Remote devices and control sensitivity are not part of a standard home inspection. Controls should be mounted a safe distance above the floor and remote control should be secured from use by children. In order to prevent personal injury or equipment damage. Automatic door operators should stop and retract the door upon meeting reasonable resistance. This function should be checked on a regular basis and adjusted/corrected as needed. If the automatic door operator unit does not have retraction capabilities or doors not retract the door properly, it should be inspected by a qualified door specialist and repaired or upgraded as needed prior to use.

Limitations/Obstructions -

More than many other areas of a house, garages tend to contain storage and other items that restrict the ability to observe the structure and other components. Any noted limitation may be in addition to normal restrictions. Recommend all obstructed areas be inspected when clear.

Electric/Wiring -

All wiring should be secured, enclosed and generally protected from physical damage, particularly at the lower areas. Extension cord use should be limited to servicing portable tools/items. Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs) are generally advised (if not required) for general garage circuits.



Report ID: / Doe
5.  ATTIC
The inspection of attic areas and the roof structure is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein. Due to typical design and accessibility constraints such as insulation, storage, finished attic surfaces, roofing products, etc., many elements and areas, including major structural components, are often at least partially concealed from view and cannot be inspected. A standard home inspection does not include an evaluation of the adequacy of the roof structure to support any load, the thermal value or energy efficiency of insulation, the integrity of vapor retarders, or the operation of thermostatically controlled fans. Older homes generally do not meet insulation and energy conservation standards required for new homes. Additional information related to attic elements and conditions may be found under other headings in this report, including ROOFS and INTERIOR ELEMENTS.
ATTIC:
Style: Open
Entrance: Ceiling Hatch
Insp. Method: From Entrance Area
ROOF CONSTRUCTION:
Framing: Wood Rafter
Deck: Plywood/OSB Sheathing
INSULATION:
Form: Loose Fill
Form: Blown-in
Type: Cellulose
Type: Wood Shavings
Est. Average: 8 to 10 Inches
Vapor Retarder: Observed - Extent Indeterminable
VENTILATION PROVISIONS:
Location: Wind Turbine
Location: Soffit
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Limited View at Rafters and Trusses
 
S F P NA NI  
        5.0 ROOF FRAMING
Rated FAIR because Inspection was limited to view from entrance. No concerns noted.
        5.1 ROOF DECK / SHEATHING
Rated FAIR because Inspection was limited to view from entrance. No concerns noted.
        5.2 VENTILATION PROVISIONS
See Home Owner Information Series Guide - Ventilation.
        5.3 INSULATION
(1) The flashlight in the photo is about 12 inches (30 cm) long.
(2) See Home Owner Information Guide - Insulation.
(3) No gasket was observed at the attic hatch and staining was observed around the insulation stops. Recommend weather stripping  to stop warm, moist air from leaking into the attic where moisture can condense on cold surfaces causing damage and possibly supporting mould growth.
        5.4 DUCTS AND PENETRATIONS
Rated FAIR because view obstructed by framework. No concerns were noted.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
5.2 VENTILATION PROVISIONS (Picture 1)
5.3(1) INSULATION (Picture 1)
5.3(3) INSULATION (Picture 1)
5.3(3) INSULATION (Picture 2)
NOTE: Attic heat, moisture levels, and ventilation conditions are subject to change.  All attics should be monitored for any leakage, moisture buildup or other concerns.  Detrimental conditions should be corrected and ventilation provisions should be improved where needed.  Any comments on insulation levels and/or materials are for general information purposes only and were not verified.  Some insulation products may contain or release potentially hazardous or irritating materials - avoid disturbing.  A complete check of the attic should be made prior to closing after non-permanent limitations/obstructions are removed.  Any stains/leaks may be due to numerous factors; verification of the cause or status of all condition is not possible. Leakage can lead to mould concerns and structural damage. If concerns exist, recommend evaluation by a qualified roofer or the appropriate specialist. 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Insulation -

An energy assessment or audit is outside the scope of the standard home inspection. Any comments on amounts and/or materials are for general informational purposes only and were not verified. Some insulations may contain or release potentially hazardous materials; avoid disturbing. Wall insulation is not readily visible. Pre-1980s homes are more likely to have been constructed with insulation levels significantly below present day standards.

Ventilation/Vapor Retarders -

Attic heat and moisture levels and ventilation adequacies are subject to change. Monitor for any significant buildup or changes and correct cause and/or improve ventilation as warranted. The presence and coverage adequacy of vapor retarders (barriers) cannot be confirmed in many cases.

Ventilation Provisions -

Adequate vent provisions must be provided for all attic areas to prevent excessive heat/ moisture buildup and consequential concerns such as roof or sheathing failure.

Chimney/Vent Clearance -

Suitable clearances from combustible materials must be maintained between vents and chimneys. Excess gaps can be covered with metal or other non-combustible materials; however, the required air gap/clearance must be maintained.



Report ID: / Doe
6(A) .  MAIN FLOOR BATH
The inspection of bathrooms is limited to readily accessible and visible elements as listed herein.  Bathrooms are high-use areas containing many elements subject to ongoing wear and periodic malfunction, particularly fixtures and other components associated with the plumbing system.  Normal usage cannot be simulated during a standard home inspection. Water flow and drainage evaluations are limited to a visual assessment of functional flow. The function and watertightness of fixture overflows or other internal fixture components generally cannot be inspected. Tub overflow outlets are prone to leakage. Do not overfill tub. Maintain water levels below overflow drain outlet to reduce the potential for leakage and water damage. A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of ancillary items such as saunas or steam baths. Additional issues related to bathroom components may be found in other sections of this report including PLUMBING SYSTEM.

Main bath
DESCRIPTION:
Full Bath
LOCATION:
Main Floor
Hallway
VENTILATOR(S):
Exhaust Fan
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Vacant House
Not Used Recently
   
S F P NA NI  
        6.0.A SINK(S)
Moderate sink surface wear or damage is generally cosmetic. If the base material has not been exposed or materially affected, the need for replacement is discretionary.
        6.1.A CABINETRY
Older cabinets observed, typical condition for age; upgrade as desired.
        6.2.A TOILET
Loose seat observed; recommend correction for improved safety.
        6.3.A BATHTUB
(1) Overflow drains are prone to leakage, and because they are concealed by design, are not inspected during a standard home inspection. Housemaster assumes no responsibility for damage caused by overfilling tub.
(2) Missing drain stopper. Inspector used a universal stopper to fill and drain tub.
        6.4.A SURROUND / ENCLOSURE
Gaps and staining in caulking observed at tub rim. Maintain caulking as required.
        6.5.A FLOORING
(1) Cracked tiles and grout observed increasing the potential for water infiltration though the surface and water damage; recommend maintenance as required.
(2) A moisture meter was used to check for subsurface moisture. No concerns noted.
        6.6.A WALLS / CEILING
Stains on ceiling and rust on fixtures suggest that the ventilation fan was not used or not left on after showering. Clean and repaint surfaces as required. Generally, fans should be operated for 1/2 hour after showering. Timer switches are available for convenience.
        6.7.A VENTILATOR(S)
        6.8.A ELECTRIC / GFCI
The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter  helps to prevent electrocution. If the GFCI circuity within the outlet detects a current leak it will shut down the receptacle and other receptacles downstream to prevent electrocution. (If the GFCI is in the panel the entire circuit will shut down.) Please note that GFCI’s are designed to protect people, not devices.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
6.0.A SINK(S) (Picture 1)
6.2.A TOILET (Picture 1)
6.3.A(1) BATHTUB (Picture 1)
6.4.A SURROUND / ENCLOSURE (Picture 1)
6.5.A(1) FLOORING (Picture 1)
6.5.A(1) FLOORING (Picture 2)
6.5.A(1) FLOORING (Picture 3)
6.5.A(2) FLOORING (Picture 1)
6.6.A WALLS / CEILING (Picture 1)
6.8.A ELECTRIC / GFCI (Picture 1)
6.8.A ELECTRIC / GFCI (Picture 2)
NOTE: Anticipate the possibility of leakage or other concerns developing with normal usage/aging or as concealed conditions are discovered with maintenance work or upon removal of carpeting, tile, shower enclosures, etc. The watertightness of all surfaces exposed to water must be maintained on a regular basis by caulking, grouting, or other means. Hot water represents a potential scalding hazard; hot water supply temperatures should be maintained at a suitable level.  The water temperature at  fixtures, especially for showering or bathing, generally will require additional  tempering for personal comfort and safety.  Due to the potential hazards associated with electric components located in bathroom areas, any identified concern should be addressed immediately. Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs) are recommended for all bathroom receptacle outlets.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
General Conditions -

Bathrooms are high use areas with many components subject to periodic malfunction, particularly those related to the plumbing system. Normal usage could not be simulated during the inspection; therefore, anticipate the possibility of leakage or other concerns developing with normal usage/aging or as latent conditions are discovered with removal of carpeting, tile, shower pans, etc. The function and watertightness of fixture overflows or other internal fixture components generally cannot be assessed. The watertightness of all tile, enclosures, and other surfaces must be maintained on a regular basis.

Water Temperatures -

The hot-water supply to all fixtures should be maintained at a safe temperature at all times.  Water temperatures in excess of 120° F (49° C) generally represent a scalding hazard for most peoples; however, children and some adults are at risk of injury at even lower temperatures.

Toilet Performance -

Assessments of toilets are based on visual operation only. No evaluation as to toilets' ability to properly dispose of waste is performed as part of a standard home inspection.

Caulking/Grouting -

A regular maintenance routine for the caulking/grouting work is required to maintain watertightness of tilework and tub/shower enclosures. Check for substrate damage when surface damage or leakage is present.

Bathtub Overflow Drains -

Overflow drains are prone to leakage and concealed by design, therefore assessment is not possible during a standard home inspection.

Ancillary Systems -

A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of ancillary items such as saunas or steam baths.

Molded Bathtubs/Showers -

Acrylic, fiberglass and other resin-based pre-fabricated bathtub units are subject to damage with normal use or improper maintenance. Surfaces may become scratched, discolored and/or difficult to clean. Cracks can also develop. These may not be readily visible/detectable, and may open up depending on shower usage. Check periodically for damage and resultant leakage.

Tile Maintenance -

Tile walls, surfaces and flooring grout and caulking require periodic maintenance. Taps and faucets require maintaining caulk seals to prevent possible seepage into walls or counters and water damage. Tile floors require maintaining grout and caulk seals especially to prevent seepage into the floor and water damage.



Report ID: / Doe
6(B) .  ENSUITE BATH
The inspection of bathrooms is limited to readily accessible and visible elements as listed herein.  Bathrooms are high-use areas containing many elements subject to ongoing wear and periodic malfunction, particularly fixtures and other components associated with the plumbing system.  Normal usage cannot be simulated during a standard home inspection. Water flow and drainage evaluations are limited to a visual assessment of functional flow. The function and watertightness of fixture overflows or other internal fixture components generally cannot be inspected. Tub overflow outlets are prone to leakage. Do not overfill tub. Maintain water levels below overflow drain outlet to reduce the potential for leakage and water damage. A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of ancillary items such as saunas or steam baths. Additional issues related to bathroom components may be found in other sections of this report including PLUMBING SYSTEM.

Ensuite bath
DESCRIPTION:
Half Bath
LOCATION:
Master Bedroom
VENTILATOR(S):
Exhaust Fan
w/ Window
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Vacant House
Not Used Recently
   
S F P NA NI  
        6.0.B SINK(S)
        6.1.B CABINETRY
Older cabinets observed, typical condition for age; upgrade as desired.
        6.2.B TOILET
        6.3.B FLOORING
(1) Cracked  and loose grout observed increasing the potential for water infiltration though the surface and water damage; recommend maintenance as required.
(2) A moisture meter is used to check for subsurface moisture. No concerns noted.
        6.4.B WALLS / CEILING
        6.5.B VENTILATOR(S)
        6.6.B ELECTRIC / GFCI
(1) Standard receptacle installed, recommend replacement with a GFCI type outlet for improved safety.
(2) The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter  helps to prevent electrocution. If the GFCI circuity within the outlet detects a current leak it will shut down the receptacle and other receptacles downstream to prevent electrocution. (If the GFCI is in the panel the entire circuit will shut down.) Please note that GFCI’s are designed to protect people, not devices.
        6.7.B WINDOW(S)
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
6.3.B(2) FLOORING (Picture 1)
6.6.B(1) ELECTRIC / GFCI (Picture 1)
6.6.B(2) ELECTRIC / GFCI (Picture 1)
NOTE: Anticipate the possibility of leakage or other concerns developing with normal usage/aging or as concealed conditions are discovered with maintenance work or upon removal of carpeting, tile, shower enclosures, etc. The watertightness of all surfaces exposed to water must be maintained on a regular basis by caulking, grouting, or other means. Hot water represents a potential scalding hazard; hot water supply temperatures should be maintained at a suitable level.  The water temperature at  fixtures, especially for showering or bathing, generally will require additional  tempering for personal comfort and safety.  Due to the potential hazards associated with electric components located in bathroom areas, any identified concern should be addressed immediately. Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs) are recommended for all bathroom receptacle outlets.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
General Conditions -

Bathrooms are high use areas with many components subject to periodic malfunction, particularly those related to the plumbing system. Normal usage could not be simulated during the inspection; therefore, anticipate the possibility of leakage or other concerns developing with normal usage/aging or as latent conditions are discovered with removal of carpeting, tile, shower pans, etc. The function and watertightness of fixture overflows or other internal fixture components generally cannot be assessed. The watertightness of all tile, enclosures, and other surfaces must be maintained on a regular basis.

Water Temperatures -

The hot-water supply to all fixtures should be maintained at a safe temperature at all times.  Water temperatures in excess of 120° F (49° C) generally represent a scalding hazard for most peoples; however, children and some adults are at risk of injury at even lower temperatures.

Toilet Performance -

Assessments of toilets are based on visual operation only. No evaluation as to toilets' ability to properly dispose of waste is performed as part of a standard home inspection.

Caulking/Grouting -

A regular maintenance routine for the caulking/grouting work is required to maintain watertightness of tilework and tub/shower enclosures. Check for substrate damage when surface damage or leakage is present.

Ancillary Systems -

A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of ancillary items such as saunas or steam baths.



Report ID: / Doe
6(C) .  BASEMENT BATH
The inspection of bathrooms is limited to readily accessible and visible elements as listed herein.  Bathrooms are high-use areas containing many elements subject to ongoing wear and periodic malfunction, particularly fixtures and other components associated with the plumbing system.  Normal usage cannot be simulated during a standard home inspection. Water flow and drainage evaluations are limited to a visual assessment of functional flow. The function and watertightness of fixture overflows or other internal fixture components generally cannot be inspected. Tub overflow outlets are prone to leakage. Do not overfill tub. Maintain water levels below overflow drain outlet to reduce the potential for leakage and water damage. A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of ancillary items such as saunas or steam baths. Additional issues related to bathroom components may be found in other sections of this report including PLUMBING SYSTEM.

Basement bath
DESCRIPTION:
Full Bath
LOCATION:
Basement
VENTILATOR(S):
Exhaust Fan
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Vacant House
Not Used Recently
   
S F P NA NI  
        6.0.C SINK(S)
(1) Reverse/poor slope at trap arm,  may contribute to blockage or backups; recommend correction as required to reduce the potential for blockage and water damage.
(2) Pop up stopper not functioning observed, only a limited inspection of drainage and leak detection was possible or performed; recommend correction/replacement as desired.
        6.1.C CABINETRY
        6.2.C TOILET
        6.3.C BATHTUB
(1) Overflow drains are prone to leakage, and because they are concealed by design, are not inspected during a standard home inspection. Housemaster assumes no responsibility for damage caused by overfilling tub.
(2) Tub is not level. Water may remain on the tub rim in the corners, indicate by mildew on the caulking. Recommend maintaining caulking or re-set the tub as required.
(3) Missing stopper. The inspector used a universal stopper to fill and drain tub.
        6.4.C SURROUND / ENCLOSURE
Maintain caulking at the tub rim.
        6.5.C FLOORING
        6.6.C WALLS / CEILING
Loose towel bars can be secured by tightening the small screws under the end posts.
        6.7.C VENTILATOR(S)
        6.8.C ELECTRIC / GFCI
The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter  helps to prevent electrocution. If the GFCI circuity within the outlet detects a current leak it will shut down the receptacle and other receptacles downstream to prevent electrocution. (If the GFCI is in the panel the entire circuit will shut down.) Please note that GFCI’s are designed to protect people, not devices.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
6.0.C(1) SINK(S) (Picture 1)
6.0.C(2) SINK(S) (Picture 1)
6.0.C(2) SINK(S) (Picture 2)
6.3.C(2) BATHTUB (Picture 1)
6.3.C(2) BATHTUB (Picture 2)
6.6.C WALLS / CEILING (Picture 1)
6.8.C ELECTRIC / GFCI (Picture 1)
6.8.C ELECTRIC / GFCI (Picture 2)
NOTE: Anticipate the possibility of leakage or other concerns developing with normal usage/aging or as concealed conditions are discovered with maintenance work or upon removal of carpeting, tile, shower enclosures, etc. The watertightness of all surfaces exposed to water must be maintained on a regular basis by caulking, grouting, or other means. Hot water represents a potential scalding hazard; hot water supply temperatures should be maintained at a suitable level.  The water temperature at  fixtures, especially for showering or bathing, generally will require additional  tempering for personal comfort and safety.  Due to the potential hazards associated with electric components located in bathroom areas, any identified concern should be addressed immediately. Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs) are recommended for all bathroom receptacle outlets.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
General Conditions -

Bathrooms are high use areas with many components subject to periodic malfunction, particularly those related to the plumbing system. Normal usage could not be simulated during the inspection; therefore, anticipate the possibility of leakage or other concerns developing with normal usage/aging or as latent conditions are discovered with removal of carpeting, tile, shower pans, etc. The function and watertightness of fixture overflows or other internal fixture components generally cannot be assessed. The watertightness of all tile, enclosures, and other surfaces must be maintained on a regular basis.

Water Temperatures -

The hot-water supply to all fixtures should be maintained at a safe temperature at all times.  Water temperatures in excess of 120° F (49° C) generally represent a scalding hazard for most peoples; however, children and some adults are at risk of injury at even lower temperatures.

Toilet Performance -

Assessments of toilets are based on visual operation only. No evaluation as to toilets' ability to properly dispose of waste is performed as part of a standard home inspection.

Caulking/Grouting -

A regular maintenance routine for the caulking/grouting work is required to maintain watertightness of tilework and tub/shower enclosures. Check for substrate damage when surface damage or leakage is present.

Bathtub Overflow Drains -

Overflow drains are prone to leakage and concealed by design, therefore assessment is not possible during a standard home inspection.

Ancillary Systems -

A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of ancillary items such as saunas or steam baths.

Molded Bathtubs/Showers -

Acrylic, fiberglass and other resin-based pre-fabricated bathtub units are subject to damage with normal use or improper maintenance. Surfaces may become scratched, discolored and/or difficult to clean. Cracks can also develop. These may not be readily visible/detectable, and may open up depending on shower usage. Check periodically for damage and resultant leakage.

Tile Maintenance -

Tile walls, surfaces and flooring grout and caulking require periodic maintenance. Taps and faucets require maintaining caulk seals to prevent possible seepage into walls or counters and water damage. Tile floors require maintaining grout and caulk seals especially to prevent seepage into the floor and water damage.



Report ID: / Doe
7.  KITCHEN
Inspection of the kitchen is limited to visible and readily accessible elements as listed herein.  Elements concealed from view or not functional at the time of inspection cannot be inspected. The inspection of cabinetry is limited to functional unit conditions based on a representative sampling; finishes and hardware issues are not included. The inspection of appliances, if performed, is limited to a check of the operation of a basic representative cycle or mode and excludes evaluation of thermostatic controls, timing devices, energy efficiency considerations, cooking or cleaning adequacies, self-cleaning functions, the adequacy of any utility connections, compliance with manufacturer installation instructions, appliance accessories, and full appliance features (i.e., all cycles, modes, and controls). Portable appliances or accessories such as washer, dryers, refrigerators, microwaves, and ice makers are generally excluded. Additional information related to kitchen elements and appliances may be found under other headings in this report.
LOCATION:
Main Floor
RANGE:
Electric Range
Design Life: 8 to 15 Years
Estimated Age: 1 to 5 Years
DISHWASHER:
Design Life: 5 to 8 Years
Estimated Age: 1 to 5 Years
REFRIGERATOR(S):
Design Life: 8 to 10 Years
Estimated Age: 15 to 20 Years
VENTILATOR:
Exhaust Fan
w/ Operable Window
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Vacant House
Not Used Recently
S F P NA NI  
        7.0 PLUMBING / SINK(S) / FAUCET(S)
(1) Odour was detected from the sink drains. May disappear once regular use resumes. It may be necessary to remove and clean the p-traps.
(2) Faucet is leaking around the handle. Leakage may stop once regular use resumes. It may be possible to stop the leak by removing the handle and tightening the cap, or Faucet replacement may be required.
(3) Missing aerator on the faucet spout. Aerators prevent splashing and are readily available at home improvement stores or plumbing suppliers.
        7.1 FLOORING
Laminate flooring observed. Laminate can be especially susceptible to water damage. Clean up spills promptly and consider replacement with a more suitable material.
        7.2 WALLS / CEILING
        7.3 ELECTRICAL / GFCI
(1) Receptacles close to sink observed, safety standards recommend GFCI receptacles,within 1.5m (5 ft) of all sinks. Recommend installation for improved safety. Dual circuits may require additional wiring for GFCI protection.  Recommend further evaluation by a licensed electrician.
(2) The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter  helps to prevent electrocution. If the GFCI circuity within the outlet detects a current leak it will shut down the receptacle and other receptacles downstream to prevent electrocution. (If the GFCI is in the panel the entire circuit will shut down.) Please note that GFCI’s are designed to protect people, not devices.
        7.4 RANGE
(1) Inspecting appliances is beyond the scope of a Standard Home Inspection, therefore, the 120 Day Limited Repair Reimbursement Guarantee does NOT cover appliances as they can fail without warning. Recommend contacting an appliance repair person should concerns exist or arise.
(2) Rated FAIR as the evaluation is limited to a visual inspection of basic overall condition. As a courtesy the inspector checked the unit for basic operation and found the burners or elements responded to controls as designed at the time of inspection. No design or heating adequacy evaluation, controls, calibration assessment or other evaluations are performed as part of a standard home inspection. The self-cleaning feature, if present, was not  tested.
        7.5 DISHWASHER
(1) Inspecting appliances is beyond the scope of a Standard Home Inspection, therefore, the 120 Day Limited Repair Reimbursement Guarantee does NOT cover appliances as they can fail without warning. Recommend contacting an appliance repair person should concerns exist or arise.
(2) Dishwasher was not functional, operating the power switch has no effect. Recommend repair by a qualified appliance repair service.
(3) The drain connection from the dishwasher is not consistent with normal practice, water will stand in the loose coil on the bottom of the cabinet and may lead to blockage or backflow; recommend that the hose be fastened as high as possible under the countertop.
        7.6 VENTILATOR
        7.7 CABINETRY
Loose hinges and mis-aligned doors  observed; adjust / tighten hinges as required.
        7.8 COUNTERTOP
Inspection of countertop areas is limited to a check of readily visible surface for any major damage/installation defects. Countertops are subject to wear and abuse. All countertop surfaces should be checked when clear of storage or obstructions.
        7.9 REFRIGERATOR
(1) Inspecting appliances is beyond the scope of a Standard Home Inspection, therefore, the 120 Day Limited Repair Reimbursement Guarantee does NOT cover appliances as they can fail without warning. Recommend contacting an appliance repair person should concerns exist or arise.
(2) Rated FAIR as the evaluation is limited to a visual inspection of the basic overall condition. As a courtesy the Inspector checked the unit for basic operation and found the refrigerator to be energized and cold at the time of inspection.
(3) The area below the unit was checked with a moisture meter and no issues were found at the time of inspection.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
7.0(2) PLUMBING / SINK(S) / FAUCET(S) (Picture 1)
7.0(3) PLUMBING / SINK(S) / FAUCET(S) (Picture 1)
7.1 FLOORING (Picture 1)
7.3(1) ELECTRICAL / GFCI (Picture 1)
7.3(1) ELECTRICAL / GFCI (Picture 2)
7.3(2) ELECTRICAL / GFCI (Picture 1)
7.4(2) RANGE (Picture 1)
7.4(2) RANGE (Picture 2)
7.4(2) RANGE (Picture 3)
7.4(2) RANGE (Picture 4)
7.5(1) DISHWASHER (Picture 1)
7.5(1) DISHWASHER (Picture 2)
7.5(3) DISHWASHER (Picture 1)
7.5(3) DISHWASHER (Picture 2)
7.7 CABINETRY (Picture 1)
7.7 CABINETRY (Picture 2)
7.7 CABINETRY (Picture 3)
7.8 COUNTERTOP (Picture 1)
7.9(2) REFRIGERATOR (Picture 1)
7.9(2) REFRIGERATOR (Picture 2)
NOTE: Many appliances typically have a high maintenance requirement and limited service life (5-12 years). Operation of all appliances should be confirmed during a pre-closing inspection. Obtain all operating instructions from the home owner or manufacturer; have the home owner demonstrate operation, if possible. Follow manufacturers' use and maintenance guidelines; periodically check all units for leakage or other malfunctions. All cabinetry/countertops should also be checked prior to closing when clear of obstructions. Utility provisions and connections, including water, waste, gas, and/or electric may require upgrading with new appliances, especially when a larger or upper-end appliance is installed. Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs) are recommended safety devices for all homes. Any water leakage or operational defects should be addressed promptly; water leakage can lead to mould and hidden/structural damage.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Appliance Utilities -

A standard home inspection do not include evaluation of the adequacy or capacity of any utility or utility connections or compliance with code or manufacturer requirements. Upgrades to water, waste, gas or electric lines may be required to meet specifications of any particular appliance; especially when a new or larger capacity appliance is added.

Cooking Appliances -

Cooking adequacies, anti-tip features, self-cleaning cycles and other accessories are not evaluated as part of a home inspection. While the proper tip over protection cannot be verified during a home inspection, all units should be checked to confirm manufacturer recommended tip-protection has been installed as a precautionary measure.

Cabinetry and Countertops Inspection Limitations -

Inspection of cabinetry is limited to a check of a representative number of readily visible components for any major damage or installation defects. Cabinets and countertops are subject to wear and abuse. All cabinets and surfaces should be checked when clear of storage or obstructions.

Range Anti-tip Bracket -

All free standing ranges should have an anti-tip bracket installed per the per manufacturer's instructions for improved safety.

Sinks/Faucets -

The feasibility of faucet repair will decrease with use/age. Sediment/debris trapped in the aerator can restrict flow; clean aerators periodically. Faucet and/or sink replacement due to surface wear/cosmetic factors would be a discretionary matter.

Electric/GFCI -

Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs) are required in the kitchens of most newer houses; they are a recommended safety improvement for older houses. Due to the high hazard potential of electric components in the kitchen area, any identified concern should be addressed immediately. While a defective GFCI receptacle may still allow electricity to flow to the receptacle (and appliance), if the field test indicated any actual or suspected malfunction of a GFCI it should be corrected.

Ventilation Provisions -

Due to the presence of cooking and washing equipment that can generate excess moisture, and in the case of gas cooking appliances which can discharge possible contaminants into the air, adequate kitchen area venting is required (window and/or mechanical vent). If not already present, exhaust air ventilators that discharge directly to the exterior should be considered.

Dishwashers -

Any assessment of an installed dishwasher is limited to a single rinse cycle operation of the motor/pump and visual check of readily accessible components. Dishwashing/cleaning adequacy and soap dispenser function were not evaluated. This is a high maintenance item. Seal leaks may develop after vacancy or other inactive periods.



Report ID: / Doe
8.  INTERIOR ELEMENTS
Inspection of the house interior is limited to readily accessible and visible elements as listed herein. Elements and areas that are inaccessible or concealed from view by any means cannot be inspected.  Aesthetic and cosmetic factors (e.g., paint and wallpaper) and the condition of finish materials and coverings are not addressed. Window and door evaluations are based on a random sampling of representative units. It is not possible to confirm safety glazing or the efficiency and integrity of insulated window/door units. Auxiliary items such as security/safety systems (or the need for same), home entertainment or communication systems, structured wiring systems, doorbells, telephone lines, central vacuums, and similar components are not included in a standard home inspection. Due to typical design restrictions, inspection of any fireplace, stove, or insert is limited to external conditions. Furthermore, such inspection addresses physical condition only; no code/fire safety compliance assessment or operational check of vent conditions is performed.  Additional information on interior elements may be provided under other headings in this report, including the FOUNDATION/SUBSTRUCTURE section and the major house systems.
PREDOMINANT WALLS & CEILINGS:
Wood Frame w/ Drywall
PREDOMINANT FLOORS:
Wood Frame
Concrete Slab at Lower Level
PREDOMINANT WINDOWS:
Casement
DETECTORS:
Location: Main Floor
Type: Smoke/Fire Detection
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Suspended/Drop Ceilings
Finish Materials
 
S F P NA NI  
        8.0 CEILINGS
(1) Cracks, blemishes, and/or nail pops in various areas observed, typical of the age of house; recommend correction as desired. If defects are large, recurring, or appear to increase in magnitude, there is likely an underlying structural concern that may need to be addressed.
(2) Wherever surface damage exists, the extent of hidden or related damaged is not part of a standard visual home inspection and should be assessed prior to performing repair. In some cases this may mean removing the finished surfaces to check the substrate or underlying structural members.
(3) Minor cracking over doorways, windows and beams is fairly typical and does not indicate structural concerns unless cracks continue to grow. Cracks can be repaired but may reappear with time.
        8.1 WALLS
(1) Wherever surface damage exists, the extent of hidden or related damaged should be assessed prior to performing repair. In some cases this may mean removing the finished surfaces to check the substrate or underlying structural members.
(2) Cracks, blemishes, and/or nail pops in various areas observed; recommend correction as desired. If defects are large, recurring, or appear to increase in magnitude, there is likely an underlying structural concern that may need to be addressed.
(3) Minor cracking over doorways, windows and beams is fairly typical and does not indicate structural concerns unless cracks continue to grow. Cracks can be repaired but may reappear with time.
        8.2 FLOORING
(1) Wherever surface damage exists, the extent of hidden or related damaged is not part of a standard visual home inspection and should be assessed prior to performing repair. In some cases this may mean removing the finished surfaces to check the substrate or underlying structural members.
(2) Cracks, blemishes, and/or other defects observed in various areas; recommend correction as desired. If defects are large, recurring, or appear to increase in magnitude, there is likely an underlying structural concern that may need to be addressed.
(3) Creaks and/or squeaks observed, characteristic of design and/or age.
        8.3 STAIRS
        8.4 RAILINGS
Loose railing observed at the front entry. Repair or remove as desired.
        8.5 WINDOWS
(1) Identification of not visible failed window seals is not part of a standard home inspection, seal failure is not always visible due to temperature variations. As a courtesy only, the inspector will indicate any failures visible during the inspection.
(2) An inventory of storms/screens should be taken to confirm desired coverage exists.
(3) Loose pins observed on the casement window cranks. Pins may fall out. Push or tap the pins back into position.
(4) All bedrooms and basement sleeping areas should have a window to the exterior suitable and accessible as an emergency egress, including functioning hardware, openable security bars if present, and adequate space at window wells if applicable; recommend checking with local code authorities (City of Edmonton) if any concerns are present and correction as required for improved safety.
(5) Living room window blind is not functional. Repair / replace as needed.
(6) Evidence of condensation at window sills observed; recommend maintenance of the surfaces and/or correction as required.
        8.6 ROOM DOORS
Basement bedroom door drags on carpet. Loose hinges observed. Tighten hinges. Trimming the door may be required to clear the carpet.
        8.7 CLOSET DOORS
        8.8 SMOKE DETECTOR(S)
(1) A standard home inspection does not include evaluating the adequacy of any existing security or safety system. Each owner should perform his/her own assessment of the systems installed and those that may be desired and/or required. A qualified specialist can also perform such an evaluation if desired. Smoke/Fire detection systems and fire extinguishers are generally recommended for all homes, and may be required in some areas. Fire officials recommend smoke detectors be installed inside of each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on each level of the home, including the basement, and not near the kitchen.  Detectors should be replaced periodically in accordance with manufacturers recommendations.

Replacing smoke  and CO detectors when a house changes occupancy is generally recommended. Detectors with 10 year batteries are now available. Carbon monoxide detectors are also now recommended for any home within 5 meters of bedrooms and in same room as wood burning fireplaces.

(2) New smoke detectors are provided, still in their packaging.
        8.9 THERMAL IMAGING
(1) Thermal imaging is used to scan for temperature variations which can indicate possible areas of heat loss, moisture intrusion and equipment malfunction which would not otherwise be detected in a home inspection.  Images require interpretation based on understanding of heat transfer in building materials. Further investigation is usually required to confirm if defects are present.
(2) Cool areas observed above windows likely indicates settled insulation, typical of the age of the house. No easy remedy is available.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
8.0(1) CEILINGS (Picture 1)
8.1(2) WALLS (Picture 1)
8.4 RAILINGS (Picture 1)
8.5(3) WINDOWS (Picture 1)
8.5(4) WINDOWS (Picture 1)
8.5(5) WINDOWS (Picture 1)
8.5(6) WINDOWS (Picture 1)
8.6 ROOM DOORS (Picture 1)
8.6 ROOM DOORS (Picture 2)
8.6 ROOM DOORS (Picture 3)
8.8(1) SMOKE DETECTOR(S) (Picture 1)
8.8(2) SMOKE DETECTOR(S) (Picture 1)
8.9(2) THERMAL IMAGING (Picture 1)
NOTE: All homes are subject to indoor air quality concerns due to factors such as venting system defects, out gassing from construction materials, smoking, and the use of house and personal care products.  Air quality can also be adversely affected by the growth of moulds, fungi and other micro-organisms as a result of leakage or high humidity conditions. If water leakage or moisture-related problems exist, potentially harmful contaminants may be present.  A home inspection does not include assessment of potential health or environmental contaminants or allergens. For air quality evaluations, a qualified testing firm should be contacted. All homes experience some form of settlement due to construction practices, materials used, and other factors. A pre-closing check of all windows, doors, and rooms when house is clear of furnishings, drapes, etc. is recommended. If the type of flooring or other finish materials that may be covered by finished surfaces or other items is a concern, conditions should be confirmed before closing. Lead-based paint may have been used in the painting of older homes. Chimney and fireplace flue inspections should be performed by a qualified specialist. Regular cleaning is recommended. An assessment should be made of the need for and placement of detectors. All smoke and carbon monoxide  detectors should be tested on a regular basis.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Smoke/Carbon Monoxide Detector Advisory -

A standard home inspection does not include evaluating the adequacy of any existing security or safety system. Occupants should perform his/her own assessment of the systems installed and those that may be desired and/or required. A qualified specialist can also perform such an evaluation if desired. Smoke/Fire detection systems and fire extinguishers are generally recommended for all homes, and may be required in some areas.
The inspection of smoke/carbon monoxide detectors is limited to the observation of general unit location only. Since these units are subject to subsequent removal or relocation, as well as the removal or failure of batteries or malfunction for various reasons, it is recommend to confirm operation and placement acceptability at the time of occupancy, and regularly thereafter (twice annually).  It is generally recommended that at least one smoke/carbon monoxide detector be placed on each floor level and in each sleeping area. Hard wired units are now often required. No determination was made as to whether units are hard wired or properly interconnected as part of a standard home inspection.
Carbon monoxide detectors are recommended for any home within 5m (16 ft.) of bedrooms and in the same room as a wood burning fireplace or appliance.
Most detectors have a finite service life and typically need replacement every 5 to 10 years, per the manufacturer's recommendations.  Unless documentation is available on the age of detectors recommend replacing all detectors prior to occupancy.

Windows and Doors -

Windows and door evaluations are based on a random sampling of a representative number of units. All units should be checked by the buyer for possible operational concerns or other deficiencies. Unless noted, presence of safety glazing at windows/doors is not evaluated.

Insulated Glass -

Insulated (double or triple glaze) windows and doors are subject to hard-to-detect failure of the airtight seal between panes. This failure can result in moisture and/or staining of the unit that can vary seasonally and increase with time. While actual/suspect seal failure may be noted, it is not within the scope of a standard inspection to assess the seal integrity of these type units. A pre-closing check of all units when house is clear of drapes, window coverings, etc. and the view of the windows is unobstructed is advised. Replacement of insulated glass windows or doors is usually required to correct failed or defective vacuum seals. Fortunately, the insulation value is usually not significantly reduced. Replacement time frame may be discretionary; however, conditions will gradually worsen with time.

Moisture/Condensation -

Moisture/condensation conditions can have numerous causes including those related to: mechanical equipment; venting; bath; laundry and kitchen venting; attic and/or crawlspace ventilation. Consideration should also be given to the presence of an adequate vapor retarder and insulation when investigating possible concerns.

Structural Components -

Evaluation of wall, ceiling or floor components is generally limited to readily visible structural conditions. Aesthetic or cosmetic factors, (e.g., paint, wallpaper) or the condition of finish materials or coverings are not considered unless specifically noted. Furthermore, it is not possible to determine the wall insulation, type or condition of surfaces or hidden structural concerns that may exist under floor cover, carpeting, paneling, drop ceilings, etc. If the type flooring is a concern, it should be confirmed before closing.

Auxiliary/Security Systems -

A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of any auxiliary house component or system (or need for same) such as an intercom, security/safety systems, central vacuum, TV, home entertainment system, doorbell, telephone or other equipment not part of primary systems. The appropriate service company should be contacted for information and assessment of element conditions.



Report ID: / Doe
9.  FOUNDATION / SUBSTRUCTURE
The inspection of the substructure and foundation is limited to readily visible and access elements as listed herein. Elements or areas concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected. In most homes, only a representative portion of the structure can be inspected.  Any element description provided is for general information purposes only; the specific material type and/or make-up cannot be verified. Neither the inspection nor report includes geological surveys, soil compaction studies, ground testing, evaluation of the effects of or potential for earth movement such as earthquakes, landslides, or sinking, rising or shifting for any reason, or verification of prior water penetration or predictions of future conditions.  Furthermore, a standard home inspection is not a wood-destroying insect inspection, an engineering evaluation, a design analysis, or a structural adequacy study, including that related to high-wind or seismic restraint requirements. Additional information related to the house structure may be found under many other headings in this report.
CONSTRUCTION TYPE:
Basement
BASEMENT AREA(S):
Location: Full House
Style: Substantially Finished
FLOOR STRUCTURE:
Floor Framing: Wood Joists
Beams: Built-up Wood
Beam Support: Metal Columns
FOUNDATION WALLS/PIERS:
Concrete
INSULATION/VAPOR RETARDERS:
Wall Insulation: Indeterminable
Vapor Retarder: Indeterminable
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Finish Materials
Suspended/Drop Ceiling
Raised Floors
S F P NA NI  
        9.0 FOUNDATION WALLS
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
        9.1 PIERS / COLUMNS
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
        9.2 MAIN BEAM(S)
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
        9.3 FLOOR FRAMING
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
        9.4 FLOOR SLAB
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
        9.5 STAIRS / RAILINGS
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
9.0 FOUNDATION WALLS (Picture 1)
9.0 FOUNDATION WALLS (Picture 2)
9.1 PIERS / COLUMNS (Picture 1) Beam and column
NOTE: All foundations are subject to settlement and movement. Improper/inadequate grading or drainage can cause or contribute to foundation damage and/or failure and water penetration.  Deficiencies must be corrected and proper grading/drainage conditions must be maintained to minimize foundation and water penetration concerns. If significant foundation movement or cracking is indicated, evaluation by an engineer or qualified foundation specialist is recommended. All wood components are subject to decay and insect damage; a wood -destroying insect inspection is recommended. Should decay and/or insect infestation or damage be reported, a full inspection should be made by a qualified specialist to determine the extent and remedial measures required. Insulation and other materials obstructing structural components are not normally moved or disturbed during a home inspection. Obstructed elements or inaccessible areas should be inspected when limiting conditions are removed. In high-wind or high-risk seismic areas, it would be advisable to arrange for an inspection of the house by a qualified specialist to determine whether applicable construction requirements are met or damage exists. Should you seek advice or wish to arrange a new inspection for elements not visible during the  inspection, please contact the Inspection Company.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Inspection Limitations -

The inspection of major structural elements is limited to an assessment of a representative portion of the readily accessible visual components. Design and adequacy factors are not considered. Insulation is not normally moved/disturbed; hidden or latent concerns cannot be identified. Any obstructed area or areas where evaluation was otherwise prevented should be inspected when limiting conditions are removed.

Finished Areas -

Inspection of structural components and other house elements may be restricted by the presence of finished surfaces and materials. No assessments is made of the suitability of renovations or finish work. Local building officials should be contracted to verify compliance with permit and inspection requirements, including fire safety, egress, and clearance issues.

Insulation/Vapor Retarders -

Assessment of the presence of a vapor retarder (barrier) is often restricted by insulation or finish materials. In colder climates, a retarder is critical and should be provided between the house and unconditioned areas such as the attic. If not installed or installed improperly, it should be corrected or conditions monitored for moisture concerns.

Foundation Conditions -

Providing/maintaining adequate foundation grading is always critical to minimize detrimental conditions. Improper/inadequate grading and/or drainage can cause/contribute to foundation movement and/or failure. Deficiencies must be corrected to prevent problems. Significant foundation movement is usually indicative of a structural concern. Whether an older or ongoing condition, evaluation by a qualified specialist is generally advised, if only as a precautionary measure. If the movement is lateral (horizontal cracking) or in some way has affected other structural components, remedial measures will usually be required.



Report ID: / Doe
10.  FOUNDATION AREA WATER PENETRATION
Comments related to water penetration issues addressed in this section of the report are generally limited to visible conditions at readily accessible at-grade/subgrade areas of the house, as specifically listed herein.  Elements and areas that are inaccessible or concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected.  Reported findings are based on conditions observable at the time of inspection. It is not possible to accurately determine the extent of any past or current conditions or to predict future conditions or concerns. This inspection is neither a flood hazard assessment nor an in-depth evaluation of water penetration conditions.  Most homes have the potential for surface or subsurface water penetration.  It is recommended that the home owner be contacted for details about the nature of past and current water penetration and moisture-related conditions.  The home owner and local authorities should also be questioned on the nature of any local flooding or water run-off conditions.  Additional information related to water penetrations issues and concerns may be found under other headings in this report, including the SITE ELEMENTS and FOUNDATION/SUBSTRUCTURE sections.
DESCRIPTION:
Basement
SUMP PUMP(S):
None Observed
INDICATIONS OF PRIOR REMEDIAL WORK:
Indeterminate
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Finished Walls
Floor Coverings
Raised Floors in Basement
   
S F P NA NI  
        10.0 EXTERIOR FEATURES / WATER INTRUSION FACTORS
(1) All houses require maintenance of roof gutters and downspouts, ground slope at foundation and clearance of ice and snow to reduce potential for basement water penetration and foundation damage.
(2) Raised garden beds tend to be relatively flat and receive irrigation, water ponding on the surface and saturating the soil below can result in water intrusion and foundation damage. Ensure that ground surface slopes away from the house and consider plantings that require little or no irrigation.
(3) Vertical cracks in the foundation surface at one or more locations observed. Vertical cracks are not normally structural concerns; recommend sealing or repair to reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.
        10.1 INTERIOR CONDITIONS / SIGNS OF WATER INTRUSION
(1) See Home Owner Information Guide - Water Penetration.
(2) No observable signs of moisture were present at time of inspection.
(3) Fully finished basement with raised floors limits inspection; however no visible stains or other evidence of moisture observed. Controlling roof water by maintaining or installing if not present downspout extensions/splash blocks, providing positive grading, sealing/repairing any foundation cracks/perforations, and ensuring proper operation/maintenance of sump pump and window wells (where applicable) will reduce potential for water infiltration.
(4) Most houses have the potential for surface or subsurface water penetration. Regardless of any specific report comments, it would be prudent in all cases to discuss local conditions and concerns with the present owner and local authorities. Any comments made in this report are based on evidence/indication present at the time of inspection only. It is not possible to accurately determine the extent of past conditions or to predict future concerns. If there are indications of prior remedial work intended to reduce water penetration concerns, documentation should be obtained from the owner and/or installer. Experience indicates that the majority of water penetration concerns are due to a combination of factors commonly related to inadequate foundation grading and drainage provisions. In many situations, relatively straightforward measures may have a direct effect on the condition; in other cases, a remedy may be more complex or impossible to achieve. Any specific recommendations in the report should be considered; however, be aware that they do not necessarily represent a complete or permanent solution to the condition.
        10.2 SUMP PUMP(S)
None installed observed; recommend consider installing a sump to help control ground water under the basement floor and reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
10.1(3) INTERIOR CONDITIONS / SIGNS OF WATER INTRUSION (Picture 1)
10.1(3) INTERIOR CONDITIONS / SIGNS OF WATER INTRUSION (Picture 2)
10.1(3) INTERIOR CONDITIONS / SIGNS OF WATER INTRUSION (Picture 3)
10.1(3) INTERIOR CONDITIONS / SIGNS OF WATER INTRUSION (Picture 4)
NOTE: Many at-grade and subgrade water penetration concerns are related to site conditions including inadequate or malfunctioning roof drains, improper foundation or site grading, and blocked drain lines. These and other deficiencies can also cause or contribute to foundation movement or failure, deterioration of wood framing and other house components, and/or wood destroying insects and mould. In many situations, relatively straightforward remedial measures such as extending or diverting downspouts, regrading along the foundation, cleaning drains, or adding a sump pump will help reduce or minimize water penetration concerns. In other cases, the remedy may be much more complex. Any specific recommendations in the report should be promptly addressed; however, be aware that such measures may not represent a complete solution to conditions. Obtain additional recommendations on correcting water penetration concerns from a qualified specialist.  If there are indications of prior remedial work, documentation should be obtained from the owner and contractor on the reasons for the work and related issues.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
General Considerations -

Most houses have the potential for surface or subsurface water penetration. Regardless of any specific report comments, it would be prudent in all cases to discuss local conditions and concerns with the present owner and local authorities. Any comments made in this report are based on evidence/indication present at the time of inspection only. It is not possible to accurately determine the extent of past conditions or to predict future concerns. If there are indications of prior remedial work intended to reduce water penetration concerns, documentation should be obtained from the owner and/or installer. Experience indicates that the majority of water penetration concerns are due to a combination of factors commonly related to inadequate foundation grading and drainage provisions. In many situations, relatively straightforward measures may have a direct effect on the condition; in other cases, the remedy may be more complex or impossible to achieve. Any specific recommendations in the report should be considered; however, be aware that they do not necessarily represent a complete or permanent solution to the condition.

Grading/Roof Drains -

Providing an adequate roof drainage system, diverting all downspouts away from the foundation and providing adequate soil grading and ground cover at the foundation and throughout the site are primary remedial factors to consider for any water penetration concerns. Improper/inadequate grading and/or drainage can cause/contribute to foundation movement and/or failure. Deficiencies must be corrected to prevent problems.

Drainage Systems -

Any drainage system that may have been installed with the original construction or added at a later date should help minimize water seepage concerns. These systems, however, can collapse, become clogged, or be overburdened; consequently, monitoring of conditions and a periodic check of flow is advised.

Floor Drains -

The termination point or function of any floor drains is not determinable within the scope of a home inspection. Any drains connected to the sanitary sewer system should have a permanent seal/cap. Floor drains are subject to backup and overflow.



Report ID: / Doe
11.  ELECTRIC SYSTEM
The inspection of the electric systems is limited to readily visible and access elements as listed herein.  Wiring and other components concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected. The identification of inherent material defects or latent conditions is not possible. The description of wiring and other components and the operational testing of electric devices and fixtures are based on a limited/random check of representative components. Accordingly, it is not possible to identify every possible wiring material/type or all conditions and concerns that may be present. Inspection of Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs) is limited to the built-in test functions. No assessment can be made of electric loads, system requirements or adequacy, circuit distribution, or accuracy of circuit labeling. Auxiliary items and electric elements (or the need for same) such as surge protectors, lighting protection systems, generators, security/safety systems, home entertainment and communication systems, structured wiring systems, low-voltage wiring, and site lighting are not included in a standard home inspection. Additional information related to electric elements may be found under other many other headings in this report.

Service entry

Garage sub-panel

Distribution panel
HOUSE SERVICE:
Service Line: Underground
MAIN DISCONNECT(S):
Type: Circuit Breaker
Location: Main Panel
Est. Size: 100 Amps
DISTRIBUTION PANEL(S):
Type: Circuit Breaker
Location: Basement
Est. Size: 125 Amps
PANEL CIRCUITS:
120 Volt Circuits: Copper & Aluminum
240 Volt Circuits: Copper Wire
CIRCUIT-INTERRUPTERS:
GFCI: At Receptacle Outlets
AFCI: None Observed
WIRING TYPE:
Non-Metallic Sheathed (Romex)
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Inaccessible Wiring
Vacant House
Not Used Recently
   
S F P NA NI  
        11.0 SERVICE / ENTRANCE LINE
        11.1 SERVICE GROUNDING PROVISIONS
(1) Grounding wire visible at panel and water pipes but unable to trace due to finish materials.
(2) Grounding wires do not normally carry electric current. They provide a low-resistance path to ground if metal parts of the house that should not carry current become energized.
        11.2 MAIN DISCONNECT(S)
        11.3 DISTRIBUTION PANEL(S)
(1) The upper cover on the distribution panel is missing. This is a serious hazard as contact with live high-amperage wires will result in electrocution. Recommend correction by a licensed electrician.
(2) Recommend tracing, confirming correct labeling, and/or additional labeling of all circuits for improved safety.
(3) See Home Owner Information Guide - Common Electrical Concerns.
(4) Improper screws for panel cover, not blunt-ended which could damage wire insulation observed; recommend replacement with approved panel screws and/or recommend further evaluation by a licensed electrician and correction as required.
(5) Open knock-out observed presenting risk of electric shock if object is inserted. Knockout plugs are recommended for safety.
        11.4 SUBPANEL GARAGE
(1) Open space(s) in panel cover observed; recommending adding proper blanking cover(s) for improved safety.
(2) Improper pointed cover screw observed, may pierce wire insulation creating a shock hazard. Recommend replacement with proper blunt screw.
        11.5 DEVICES
(1) Cracked cover plate is caused by over-tightening the screws. There may be others.
(2) Wires not properly secured in light fixture in the utility room. Recommend further investigation and correction as required.
        11.6 WIRING / CONDUCTORS
(1) Inspected where visible only, house design and finished areas obscures components and limits visible inspection of all components.
(2) Aluminum wires observed on some circuits. Aluminum 120V wiring is an ongoing maintenance concern.  Connections must be clean and tight and only devices that are suitable for aluminum wire should be used. In most cases 'pig-tailing' is an acceptable correction and can be done by a licensed electrician.  Recommended that houses with aluminum wiring on the household circuits be checked by an licensed electrician to confirm acceptability of all connections and to determine if any remedial measures are required. Actions/methods required will vary among electricians and agencies involved with electric safety. If possible, ask the current owner if remedial work has been performed.  If prior remedial work is indicated, recommend obtaining documentation that the remedial work was done to proper standards. Recommend checking with Insurance Company and Lending Company as to insurability and acceptability. See Home Owner Information Guide - Aluminum Wiring.
        11.7 GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER(S)
(1) The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter  helps to prevent electrocution. If the GFCI circuity within the outlet detects a current leak it will shut down the receptacle and other receptacles downstream to prevent electrocution. (If the GFCI is in the panel the entire circuit will shut down.) Please note that GFCI’s are designed to protect people, not devices.
(2) Inspected where installed; recommend that they be installed in all high hazard areas, e.g. bathrooms, garages, kitchens, laundry room and exteriors.  Recommend a licensed electrician assess the need and appropriate locations for GFCIs and correct as required.
        11.8 ARC FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER(S)
No Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters were observed. Consider installing AFCI's  for improved safety. AFCI's can prevent fires by stopping flow of electrical current, if arcing, due to loose or worn connections is detected. In 2015 the Canadian Electrical Code was updated to include AFCI's on most types of outlets in residential homes excluding sump pumps and other various types of receptacles. Consider upgrading. A licensed electrician can advise on appropriate locations for AFCI's.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
11.3(1) DISTRIBUTION PANEL(S) (Picture 1)
11.3(4) DISTRIBUTION PANEL(S) (Picture 1)
11.3(5) DISTRIBUTION PANEL(S) (Picture 1)
11.4(1) SUBPANEL GARAGE (Picture 1)
11.4(1) SUBPANEL GARAGE (Picture 2)
11.4(2) SUBPANEL GARAGE (Picture 1)
11.4(2) SUBPANEL GARAGE (Picture 2)
11.5(1) DEVICES (Picture 1)
11.5(2) DEVICES (Picture 1)
11.6(2) WIRING / CONDUCTORS (Picture 1)
11.7(1) GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER(S) (Picture 1)
NOTE: Older electric service may be minimally sufficient or inadequate for present/future needs. Service line clearance from trees and other objects must be maintained to minimize the chance of storm damage and service disruption. The identification of inherent electric panel defects or latent conditions is not possible. It is generally recommended that aluminum-wiring systems be checked by an electrician to confirm acceptability of all connections and to determine if any remedial measures are required. GFCIs are recommended for all high hazard areas (e.g., kitchens, bathrooms, garages and exteriors).  AFCIs are relatively new devices now required on certain circuits in new homes.  Consideration should be given to adding these devices in existing homes. The regular testing of GFCIs and AFCIs using the built-in test function is recommended. Recommend tracing and labeling of all circuits, or confirm current labeling is correct. Any electric defects or capacity or distribution concerns should be evaluated and/or corrected by a licensed electrician.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupters -

GFCIs are designed to improve personal safety and are recommended for all houses. Regular testing of GFCIs is required to ensure proper operation and protection. In most areas GFCIs have only been required on certain circuits since the mid-1970s. It is recommended that GFCIs be installed in all high hazard areas (e.g., kitchens, bathrooms, garages and exteriors).

Panel Labeling -

No determination was made of individual circuit distribution or accuracy of any circuit labeling. Recommend tracing and labeling, or confirm correct labeling, of all circuits.

Concealed Electric -

Due to house design, aside from electric devices and fixtures visible within the house, many electric system components are concealed and therefore could not be inspected.  While it may be difficult to fully assess electric system conditions without opening walls or other destructive measures, an inspection and evaluation by a licensed electrician is recommended as a precautionary measure.

Light Fixtures/Switches -

Light fixtures, ceiling fans, etc., are generally randomly checked to assess basic wiring conditions. Any inoperative unit may be due to a defective fixture or bulb, connection to undetected switch or other factors.

Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters -

Many areas required the installation of a safety device, known as an Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter (AFCI's), in new construction. The purpose of an AFCI is to reduce fire hazards associated with frayed wires and electric arcing, particularly in areas such as living rooms and bedrooms were corded fixtures are used. AFCI's are not be evaluated as part of a standard home inspection. If present, AFCI devices should be checked periodically. If not present consider upgrading for safety. Should an AFCI "trip," it should be left in the "tripped" or "off" position, and arrangements should be made to have the circuit in question checked by a licensed electrician.

Electric Equipment Issues -

Product notices or advisories are periodically issued for certain electric equipment due to inherent defects or latent concerns. For further information related to product defects and possible recalls please visit CSA International's website at http://www.csa-international.org/product_recalls/search/ or The Consumer Product Safety Commission's website at http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prerel.html

Aluminum Wiring - 120 V Circuits -

It is generally recommended that houses with aluminum wiring on the household circuits be checked by an electrician to confirm acceptability of all connections and to determine if any remedial measures are required. Recommended actions/methods will vary among electricians and agencies involved with electric safety. If prior remedial work is indicated, obtain documentation.



Report ID: / Doe
12.  HEATING SYSTEM
The inspection of heating systems is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein.  Elements concealed from view or not functional at the time of inspection for any reason cannot be inspected. A standard home inspection does not include a heat-loss analysis, heating design or adequacy evaluation, energy efficiency assessment, installation compliance check, chimney flue inspection or draft test, solar system inspection, or buried fuel tank inspection.  Furthermore, portable units and system accessories or add-on components such electronic air cleaners, humidifiers, and water treatment systems are not inspected, unless specifically indicated.  The functional check of heating systems is limited to the operation of a basic cycle or mode and excludes the evaluation of thermostatic controls, timing devices, analysis of distribution system flow or temperatures, or operation of full system features (i.e., all cycles, modes, and controls). Additional information related to the heating system may be found under other headings in this report, including the COOLING SYSTEM section.

Vent connectors

Burner flames
TYPE SYSTEM:
Natural Gas
Warmed Forced Air
MAKE:
Carrier
ESTIMATED AGE:
10 to 15 Years
DESIGN LIFE:
15 to 20 Years
LOCATION:
Basement
Utility Room
COMBUSTION AIR SOURCE:
Outside Air Duct
VENT TYPE:
B-Vent
GENERAL DISTRIBUTION:
Ducted w/ Registers
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Nearly 100% Concealed Distribution
Inaccessible Heat Exchanger
Vacant House
Not Used Recently
S F P NA NI  
        12.0 HEATING UNIT(S)
(1) Rated FAIR because although the unit was functional at the time of inspection furnaces over 5 years old have a higher probability of requiring repairs or other remedial work. More stringent maintenance and servicing routines are required to keep furnaces running well throughout their design life. Lack of preventative maintenance and regular servicing are the leading causes of furnace repairs and premature failure for models of this age.
(2) Carbon monoxide level was normal. This does not guarantee there are no heat exchanger perforations. Recommend use of CO detectors within 5 meters of all bedrooms. Maximum CO concentration for a continuous 8 hour exposure (OSHA) is 25 ppm. See Home Owner Information Guide - Carbon Monoxide.
(3) System design obscures some components and were Inspected where visible only.
(4) See Home Owner Information Guide - Warm Air Heating.
(5) The inspection of the Furnace is limited to a visual inspection and a basic evaluation of the overall unit. Due to normal design constraints the heat exchangers, control board, system ignitors, flame sensors and pressure switches cannot be assessed within the scope of a standard inspection and are NOT covered by the HouseMaster Guarantee. Flame sensors and igniters are considered high maintenance items and require regular cleaning and eventual replacement. Independent evaluation by an HVAC specialist is highly advised, as well as adhering to a regular maintenance and servicing routine as per the manufacturer's recommendations.
        12.1 BURNERS
        12.2 GAS / FUEL LINE AT UNIT(S)
        12.3 VENT CONNECTOR(S)
        12.4 COMBUSTION AIR PROVISIONS
The combustion air duct has been disconnected, the exterior air intake is connected to the clothes dryer duct.This can affect furnace operation as well as create potential carbon monoxide hazards; recommend restoring the combustion air duct and removing the duct tape blocking the anti-draft pot.
        12.5 BLOWER / FAN
The blower motor is concealed by design and not accessible throughout the course of a standard home inspection, therefore it cannot be inspected nor is it covered by the HouseMaster Guarantee.
        12.6 AIR FILTER
        12.7 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
(1) Add-on components or systems (electronic air cleaners, humidifiers, water treatment systems, etc.) are not evaluated as part of a standard home inspection unless specifically indicated.
(2) Inspected where visible only, finished areas obscures components and limits visible inspection of all components.
(3) Humidifiers require regular cleaning and maintenance. Humidifiers, if used, should be set for 30% to 50%  relative humidity (RH) for human comfort. RH above 60 % can support mould growth.
        12.8 THERMOSTAT(S)
(1) Evaluation is limited to physical condition, mounting methods, and basic response to set point adjustment for heating system operation. No assessment of calibration accuracy, response time, effectiveness, or the function of features or components are performed as part of a standard home inspection.
(2) Thermostat not securely mounted level on the wall observed which may effect calibration; recommend correction as required.
        12.9 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS
A plug and receptacle is used for a service disconnect, and the plug wires are exposed and not secured. Recommend that a proper disconnect switch be installed for safety.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
12.0(2) HEATING UNIT(S) (Picture 1)
12.4 COMBUSTION AIR PROVISIONS (Picture 1)
12.4 COMBUSTION AIR PROVISIONS (Picture 2)
12.4 COMBUSTION AIR PROVISIONS (Picture 3)
12.8(1) THERMOSTAT(S) (Picture 1)
NOTE: Regular heating system maintenance is important. The older the unit the greater the probability of system deficiencies or failure. Combustion air provisions, clearances to combustibles, and venting system integrity must be maintained for safe operation. Any actual or potential concerns require immediate attention, as health and safety hazards may exist, including the potential for carbon monoxide poisoning. A thorough inspection of heat exchangers by a qualified heating specialist is recommended to determine heat exchanger conditions, particularly if the unit is beyond 5+ years old or any wear is indicated. Heating comfort will vary throughout most houses due to house or system design or other factors. Filters need to be replaced/cleaned on a regular basis; periodic duct cleaning may be required. Insulation on older heating systems may contain asbestos. Independent evaluation is required to address any possible asbestos or buried fuel tank concerns. Servicing or repair of heating systems should be made by a qualified specialist.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Heat Exchanger -

The heart of a furnace is a metal chamber referred to as a heat exchanger. All or most areas of this exchanger are not readily accessible or visible to a home inspector. Therefore, assessment of a furnace is limited to external and operational conditions. The older the unit, the greater the probability of failure. A thorough inspection by a qualified HVAC contractor is advised for full evaluation of heat exchanger conditions, particularly if the unit is beyond 5+ years old or any wear is exhibited. Check filters monthly; replace/clean as needed.

Auxiliary Equipment -

Add-on components or systems (electronic air cleaners, humidifiers, water treatment systems, etc.) are not evaluated unless specifically indicated.

Humidifiers -

Humidifiers are high maintenance items and require regular cleaning and servicing. They are beneficial for maintaining indoor humidity at a comfortable level; however, presence of a humidifier may adversely affect the life of a furnace. Evaluation of humidifiers is not included in a home inspection.

Combustion Air -

All fuel-burning units require adequate air supply for proper combustion and to prevent backdrafting concerns at this or other units. Combustion air may be supplied by room air, room vents or direct ducting from the exterior.

Maintenance/Service -

Servicing or repair of the heating system normally must be done by a qualified service company; most utility companies only service/handle gas supply concerns.

Blower/Filters -

Missing or clogged filters can affect system operation and possibly reduce the service life of the unit. Replace/clean filters as needed. Ductwork/blower cleaning may also be required periodically, particularly if the unit was operated without a filter.

Thermostats -

Inspection of any thermostat condition is limited to its physical condition, mounting methods, and basic response to set point adjustment for cooling system operation. No evaluation is made of calibration accuracy, response time, effectiveness, or the function of each and every feature or components. Consult with the owner or current occupants on operation, and confirm proper operation of system.

Flue/Venting -

All venting systems must be maintained to ensure an adequate draft. Any indication of a potential concern requires immediate attention as health/safety hazards may exist, including the introduction of carbon monoxide into the house air.

HVAC Upgrading -

No evaluations are made as part of a standard home inspection regarding heating, ventilation, or air conditioning system design, system, adequacy, compliance with current energy standards or costs, and other factors that may be associated with the need to or desire to repair, replace, or upgrade any equipment. If new equipment is required or desired, now or in the future, in addition to costs associated with the purchase and installation of the equipment itself, there may be additional expenses related to structural alteration or air handler and distribution system replacement or alterations. 

Mid-Efficiency Units -

Heat exchangers in mid-efficient furnaces are not fully visible and therefore not fully inspected. Flame sensors and hot surface igniter are considered high maintenance items. Sensors require regular cleaning and eventual replacement. These items are not covered under the HouseMaster guarantee.



Report ID: / Doe
13.  PLUMBING SYSTEM
The inspection of the plumbing system is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein. Piping and other components concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected. Material descriptions are based on a limited/random check of representative components. Accordingly, it is not possible to identify every piping or plumbing system material, or all conditions or concerns that may be present. A standard home inspection does not include verification of the type water supply or waste disposal, analysis of water supply quantity or quality, inspection of private onsite water supply or sewage (waster disposal) systems, assessment/analysis of lead piping/solder or lead-in-water concerns, or a leakage test of gas/fuel piping or storage systems. Furthermore, the function and effectiveness of any shut-off/control valves, water filtration or treatment equipment, irrigation/fire sprinkler systems, outdoor/underground piping, backflow preventers (anti-siphon devices), laundry standpipes, vent pipes, floor drains, fixture overflows, and similar features generally are not evaluated. Additional information related to plumbing elements may be found under other headings in this report, including BATHROOMS and KITCHEN.

Gas service entry
WATER SUPPLY PIPING:
Copper
DRAIN/WASTE LINES:
Plastic (PVC/ABS)
LOCATION OF SHUT-OFFS:
Water: At Meter
Water: At Laundry
Water: At fixtures
Water: At Water Heater
Gas: At Meter
Gas: At Fixtures
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Inaccessible Piping
Vacant House
Not Used Recently
   
S F P NA NI  
        13.0 WATER SUPPLY PIPING
(1) Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
(2) See Home Owner Information Guide - Common Plumbing Concerns.
(3) Water shut-offs are not exercised during inspection. Consider exercising shut-off valves annually. Valves that are stuck or leak should be repaired or replaced.
(4) The solder used to join copper pipes and fittings prior to the late 1980's may contain lead. Its use was discontinued due to health concerns. Municipal water suppliers adjust water chemistry to minimize corrosion of piping and  lead in the water.  Residential users can further minimize exposure by running the water for a few minutes each morning and using a filter.  Recommend Health Canada's Minimizing Exposure to Lead from Drinking Water Distribution Systems for more information.
        13.1 WATER FLOW AT FIXTURES
        13.2 DRAIN / WASTE PIPING
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
        13.3 FIXTURE DRAINAGE
        13.4 GAS PIPING
Inspected where visible only, house design and finished areas obscures components and limits visible inspection of all components. Accessible joints and fittings were checked for leaks with a combustible gases meter.
        13.5 LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT
(1) Neither the laundry equipment, the utility hook-ups (water, electric and gas), nor venting and waste lines for any particular appliance are evaluated as part of a standard inspection. Personal concerns related to any laundry equipment or hook-up needs of new equipment should be assessed by a qualified tradesman. These appliances are not inspected and not covered under the HouseMaster Guarantee.
(2) See comment in Section 12.4 above.
        13.6 LAUNDRY SINK/BASEMENT SINK
Laundry sink: Satisfactory
        13.7 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS
Basement range hood: Satisfactory
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
13.0(4) WATER SUPPLY PIPING (Picture 1)
13.4 GAS PIPING (Picture 1)
13.5(1) LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT (Picture 1)
13.5(1) LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT (Picture 2)
13.6 LAUNDRY SINK/BASEMENT SINK (Picture 1)
13.6 LAUNDRY SINK/BASEMENT SINK (Picture 2)
13.7 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS (Picture 1)
NOTE: Recommend obtaining documentation/verification on the type water supply and waste disposal systems. If private onsite water and/or sewage systems are reported/determined to exists, independent evaluation (including water analyses) is recommended. Plumbing systems are subject to unpredictable change, particularly as they age (e.g., leaks may develop, water flow may drop, or drains may become blocked). Plumbing system leakage can cause or contribute to mould and/or structural concerns. Some piping may be subject to premature failure due to inherent material deficiencies or water quality problems, (e.g., polybutylene pipe may leak at joints, copper water pipe may corrode due to acidic water, or old galvanized pipe may clog due to water mineral content). Periodic cleaning of drain lines, including underground pipes will be necessary. Periodic water analyses are recommended to determine if water filtration and treatment systems are needed. Confirm and label gas and water shut-off valve locations. A qualified plumber should perform all plumbing system repairs.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Plumbing System Maintainance -

All plumbing faucets and valves, including those at sinks, toilets, bathtubs, showers and laundry areas, will require periodic maintenance as washers, gaskets and other components dry out or become worn over time. The potential for leakage related to these components should be anticipated, particularly in older homes that are vacant for extended periods or that otherwise are not used regularly. Related repair needs are considered part of routine maintenance program.

Anti-Scald Devices -

Modern water-supply valves designed for use in showers generally have controls that sense the hot and cold water pressures and/or the water-supply temperature to determine if the water flow is likely above a safe level. Verification of the presence of anti-scald valves or determination of whether these devices meet design criteria and operate safely are not within the scope of a standard home inspection. If anti-scald protection is not present, caution should be used whenever bathing or showering. Temperature settings at the water heater or supply system should be maintained at the manufacturer's recommended level. Consideration should be given to upgrading to supply anti-scald protection if not currently installed via showerheads, bath spigots or mixing valves.

Shut Off/Location -

Confirm and label gas and water shut-off valve locations. Provide full access at all times in case of emergency or servicing.

Anti-Backup Mechanisms -

A standard home inspection does not include the verification of presence or correct operation of any sewer and/or drainage anti-backup mechanism or system as these components are normally not readily visible. No inspection was possible or performed.

Plumbing Components -

Evaluation of the plumbing system was limited to permanently connected fixtures and readily visible pipe conditions. The function and effectiveness of laundry standpipes, vent pipes, floor drains, fixture overflows, anti-siphon devices and similar items generally cannot be evaluated. Conditions are subject to unpredictable change, e.g., leaks may develop, water flow may drop, drains may become blocked, etc. The detection of sewer gases and the condition/function of sub-slab or in-ground piping is excluded from a standard inspection. In-ground piping is subject to blockage/collapse.

Dryer Venting -

Dryer vents should be ducted directly to the exterior to prevent moisture-related conditions and potential fire concerns due to lint buildup. Plastic flex duct is generally considered unacceptable. Advise the use of metal ducts and regular cleaning of all ducts.

Laundry Equipment -

Neither the laundry equipment, the utility hook-ups (water, electric and gas), nor venting and waste lines for any particular appliance are evaluated as part of a standard inspection. Personal concerns related to any laundry equipment or hook-up needs of new equipment should be assessed by a qualified tradesman. If operated, no determination of cleaning and/or drying adequacy is made, unless specifically noted.

Rubber Washing Machine Hoses -

Rubber type washing machine lines are more prone to deterioration over time and bursting. Recommend replacement with braided stainless steel lines to reduce the potential for catastrophic failure and water damage.



Report ID: / Doe
14.  WATER HEATER(S)
The inspection of hot water supply systems is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein. Elements concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected. All standard water heaters require temperature-pressure relief valves (TPRV); these units are not operated during a standard home inspection but should be checked regularly for proper operation. A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of the adequacy/capacity of hot water supply systems, or inspection of saunas, steam baths, or solar systems. An increase in the hot water supply system capacity may be needed for large jetted baths or other fixtures requiring a large volume of hot water, or when bathroom or plumbing facilities are added or upgraded. Additional information related to the hot water supply system may be found under other headings in this report, including the BATHROOMS and PLUMBING SYSTEM sections.
TYPE:
Direct-heated Tank
ENERGY SOURCE/FUEL:
Natural Gas
MAKE:
A.O. Smith
ESTIMATED CAPACITY:
+/- 150 l, 40 US Gallons
ESTIMATED AGE:
1 to 5 Years
DESIGN LIFE:
8 to 10 Years
COMBUSTION AIR SOURCE:
Outside Air Duct
VENT TYPE:
Single-Wall Connector to B-Vent Stack
LOCATION:
Basement
Utility Room
SPECIAL LIMITATIONS:
Vacant House
Not Used Recently
Flammable Vapour Ignition Resistant
   
S F P NA NI  
        14.0 WATER HEATER(S)
Flammable Vapor Ignition Resistant type of unit observed. No access to combustion chamber present; no inspection was possible or performed. These type of units have metal mesh on the combustion air intake. There is potential for the intake to plug with debris such as lint, dust, etc; recommend cleaning air intake area periodically. Some units have a reset, however most units have a fuseable link on the thermocouple that must be replaced if unit shuts down due to poor intake air flow.
        14.1 GAS / FUEL LINE AT UNIT
        14.2 VENT CONNECTOR
        14.3 COMBUSTION AIR PROVISIONS
See comment in 12.4 above.
        14.4 SAFETY VALVE PROVISIONS
Water heater relief valves are not exercised during a standard inspection. Exercising the relief valve is a maintenance task requiring monitoring afterward for leakage.  Refer to manufacturer's recommendations for maintenance requirements.
S F P NA NI S= Satisfactory, F= Fair, P= Poor/Defective, NA= Not Applicable, NI= Not Inspected
14.4 SAFETY VALVE PROVISIONS (Picture 1)
NOTE: Maintaining hot-water supply temperatures at no more that 130° F (55° C) for will reduce the risk of injury; hot water represents a potential scalding hazard. Anti-scald devices are available as an added safety measure. The combustion chamber or ignition sources of water heaters and other mechanical equipment in garage areas should be positioned/maintained at least 18 inches above the floor for safety reasons. Adequate clearance to combustibles must also be maintained around the unit and any vents. Restraining straps are generally required on heaters in active seismic zones. Safety valve (TPRV) discharge should be through a drain line to a readily visible area that can be monitored. Newer tanks should be drained periodically, but many old tanks are best left alone. Tankless or boiler coils systems have little or no storage capacity; a supplemental storage tank can often be added if needed. A qualified plumber or specialist should perform all water heating system repairs.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION - Review the additional details below.
Domestic Hot Water -

The adequacy of the domestic hot water supply or temperatures was not determined. Evaluations are limited to assessment of visual conditions and confirmation of heated water flow to the fixtures. Newer tanks should be drained periodically, but many old tanks are best left alone.

Flue/Venting Conditions -

All venting systems must be maintained to ensure an adequate draft. Any indication of a potential concern requires immediate attention as health/safety hazards may exist, including the introduction of carbon monoxide into the house air.

Relief Valves -

All standard water heaters require temperature-pressure relief valves (TPRV). These units are not operated during a standard home inspection but should be checked regularly for proper operation.


Report ID: / Doe
SUMMARY OF INSPECTOR COMMENTS
This Summary of Inspector Comments is only one section of the Inspection Report and is provided for guidance purposes only. This Summary is NOT A HOME INSPECTION REPORT and does not include information on all conditions or concerns associated with this home or property. The Inspection Report includes more detailed information on element ratings/conditions and associated information and must be read and considered in its entirety prior to making any conclusive purchase decisions or taking any other action. Any questionable issues should be discussed with the Inspector and/or Inspection Company.

Note: While listings in this Summary of Inspector Comments may serve as a guide to help prioritize remedial needs, the final decision regarding any action to be taken must be made by the client following consultation with the appropriate specialists or contractors.

1.  ROOFING
1.0  ROOFING  
Fair
1.0 (1) See Home Owner Information Guide - Ice Dams.
1.0 (2) Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise. Shingles appeared to be in good condition on the south side at the eaves where the inspector brushed away snow and ice.
1.2  CHIMNEYS / VENTS  
Fair
Snow cover prevents close inspection. Viewed from ladder at the eaves. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise.
1.3  EXPOSED FLASHING  
Fair
Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise.
1.5  PLUMBING STACKS  
Fair
The plumbing vent stacks are low, typical of the age of the house,  and may be subject to blockage with debris and snow. Blockage can affect fixture drainage; Consider extending the stacks.
1.6  RAIN GUTTERS / EAVE TROUGHS  
Fair
1.6 (1) All gutters should be checked for damage, blockage, or overflow on a regular basis. Overflow may cause water penetration and/or damage to roof sheathing fascia, soffits, etc. Gutter guards may help in cases where leaves and other debris routinely accumulate in a short period of time.
1.6 (2) Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise. No concerns noted where visible.

2.  EXTERIOR ELEMENTS
2.0  SIDING  
Fair
2.0 (1) Recommend maintaining seals at exterior penetrations reduce the potential for water infiltration and and insect problems.
2.0 (2) A few hairline cracks were observed. Monitor for cracks becoming larger and repair as required.
2.2  ENTRY DOORS  
Fair
No deadbolt lock observed at the rear door. Consider installing a deadbolt lock for improved security.
2.4  DECK(S)  
Fair
2.4 (1) Inspection based on visible areas only. Structure of deck not visible and was not inspected.
2.4 (2) Ground level decks are subject to earlier deterioration and should be maintained as required.
2.4 (3) Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise.
2.6  FOUNDATION SURFACE  
Fair
2.6 (1) Vertical cracks at one or more locations observed. Vertical cracks are not normally structural concerns; recommend sealing or repair to reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.
2.6 (2) Main beam popping  observed on the East and West sides. Recommend further investigation to check for foundation cracking at the beam pockets; this will require exposing the foundation wall by removing some finishes at the exterior or interior. Cracking at the beam pockets should be addressed by a foundation repair specialist. The foundation coating (parging) should be repaired to prevent water entry.

The foundation coating  has been repaired on the East (driveway) side. If possible, ask the current owner for historical information in case the foundation wall has been examined previously.

2.6 (3) Cracking was observed near the South-West corner. Corner cracking may indicate a structural concern. Recommend further investigation by digging below the parging to view the foundation wall. Spreading or displacement at cracks or cracks wider than 1/4 inch should be addressed by a foundation repair specialist.
2.7  ELECTRIC / GFCI  
Fair
2.7 (1) See Home Owner Information Guide - Common Electrical Problems
2.7 (2) The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter  helps to prevent electrocution. If the GFCI circuity within the outlet detects a current leak it will shut down the receptacle and other receptacles downstream to prevent electrocution. (If the GFCI is in the panel the entire circuit will shut down.) Please note that GFCI’s are designed to protect people, not devices.
2.7 (3) The green plug in the photos is a testing device.
2.7 (4) Standard receptacle observed; recommend installing GFCI protected receptacle(s). GFCIs have been required for exterior receptacle outlets installed within 2.5 meters from grade (8 ft.) for many years and they are a recommended safety improvement for all homes.
2.8  EXTERIOR FAUCETS  
Fair
2.8 (1) Due to temperature below the freezing point no inspection was possible or performed; recommend further evaluation when temperatures are above freezing.
2.8 (4) Add-on vacuum breakers are available to upgrade older faucets. Vacuum breakers are a type of backflow preventer that prevents water standing in hoses from being siphoned back into the house and contaminating potable water.

3.  SITE ELEMENTS
3.0  PATIO(S)  
Fair
3.0 (1) View limited by snow cover; recommend checking for cracking and slope when visible to ensure water drains away from foundation. Recommend sealing any cracks as required.
3.0 (2)

The significance of spalling and/or cracking of concrete or other walkway surfaces will depend on the location of the damage and its severity. In some cases function may not be affected and minor repair or surface sealing may minimize further deterioration. Replacement of affected areas will be required if there is any significant displacement or damage.

3.0 (3) Patio settled toward the house observed. All patio surfaces should be constructed and maintained so that they slope away from the foundation and water runs off freely; recommend keeping free and clear of snow and water and maintain the sealant at the foundation; consider mud jacking, re-grading, or replacement to minimize the potential for water infiltration.
3.1  DRIVEWAY  
Fair
3.1 (1) Ice cover limits evaluation to visible areas only; recommend checking for cracking and slope when visible.
3.1 (2) Spalling and cracking observed; the significance of spalling and cracking of asphalt, concrete or other driveway surfaces will depend on the location of the damage and its severity. In some cases function may not be affected and spot repair and/or surface sealing may minimize further deterioration and extend its service life. Replacement of affected areas may be required if there is any significant displacement or damage.
3.2  WALKWAYS  
Fair
Spalling and cracking observed; the significance of spalling and/or cracking of concrete or other walkway surfaces will depend on the location of the damage and its severity. In some cases function may not be affected and minor repair or surface sealing may minimize further deterioration. Replacement of affected areas may be required if there is any significant displacement or damage.
3.3  WINDOW WELLS  
Fair
Recommend keeping window wells free and clear of soil and debris to ensure proper operation and drainage.
3.4  GROUND SLOPE AT FOUNDATION  
Fair
3.4 (1) Raised garden beds tend to be relatively flat and receive irrigation, water ponding on the surface and saturating the soil below can result in water intrusion and foundation damage. Ensure that ground surface slopes away from the house and consider plantings that require little or no irrigation.
3.4 (2) A sloped surface is required to effectively drain water away from the foundation walls including areas under steps and decks. This will greatly reduce the risk of surface water from rainfall and snowmelt causing damage to the foundation and entering the basement.
3.5  SITE GRADING  
Fair
Snow limits assessment of grade and drainage of the lot around house; recommend further evaluation when clear.  A positive slope should be maintained to move water away from foundation to reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.

4.  DETACHED GARAGE
4.0  ROOFING  
Fair
Snow cover limits evaluation to visible areas only. Curling and erosion of shingles was observed on the West side where the inspector cleared snow and ice. Anticipate the need to replace the shingles. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional when clear and safe to do so or if concerns arise.
4.2  FASCIA / SOFFITS  
Fair
Flaking paint and loose soffits observed. Repair as required to prevent further deterioration and pest entry.
4.3  RAIN GUTTERS / EAVE TROUGHS  
Fair
4.3 (1) All gutters should be checked for damage, blockage, or overflow on a regular basis. Overflow may cause water penetration and/or damage to roof sheathing fascia, soffits, etc. Gutter guards may help in cases where leaves and other debris routinely accumulate in a short period of time.
4.3 (2) Snow/frost limits view and access,  recommend further evaluation when clear and accessible.
4.4  DOWNSPOUTS / ROOF DRAINS  
Fair
Short downspout at the South-West corner was likely for a rain barrel. Recommend an extension to direct water away from the foundation.
4.5  SIDING  
Fair
4.5 (1) Recommend maintaining seals at exterior penetrations reduce the potential for water infiltration and and insect problems.
4.5 (2) Cracked and damaged parging observed. Recommend repair to prevent water damage to wood sheathing and framing.
4.6  GROUND SLOPE AT FOUNDATION  
Fair
Snow limits assessment of grade and drainage around house observed; recommend further evaluation when clear.  A positive slope should be maintained to move water away from foundation to reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.
4.8  FLOOR SLAB  
Fair
Cracking and settlement of floor slab observed with indications that water has accumulated in the corners. The corners have been capped with concrete topping which likely will deteriorate with time. Consider further investigation by a concrete repair specialist.
4.9  FOUNDATION  
Not Inspected
The floor slab likely is the foundation on this type of structure.
4.10  WALLS & CEILING  
Poor/Defective
4.10 (1) Cracks and nail pops in wall/ceiling surfaces due to construction methods, material, framing movement, and other factors observed. Minor surface conditions can generally be repaired, but the need for periodic repair should be anticipated. If defects are large, recurring, or appear to increase in magnitude, there is likely an underlying structural concern that may need to be evaluated.
4.10 (2) Signs of water damage and possible mould was observed in the corners where the concrete slab has settled. Recommend further investigation and repair to prevent further deterioration.
4.12  SERVICE DOOR(S)  
Poor/Defective
Service door deadbolt would not unlock. Recommend further investigation and repair as required.
4.13  VEHICLE DOOR(S)  
Fair
Door is functional  but rated FAIR due to age. Wood deterioration, weathered frame and loose trim was observed. Repair / replace as desired.
4.14  DOOR OPERATOR(S)  
Satisfactory
4.14 (1) Electric-eye style sensor observed. Door correctly reversed when beam was interrupted; recommend checking for proper function regularly.
4.14 (2) Door operator correctly reversed when downward travel was resisted; see manufacturer's recommendations for performing periodic safety checks.
4.15  ELECTRICAL  
Fair
Storage limits access to some receptacles, spot checked only.

5.  ATTIC
5.0  ROOF FRAMING  
Fair
Rated FAIR because Inspection was limited to view from entrance. No concerns noted.
5.1  ROOF DECK / SHEATHING  
Fair
Rated FAIR because Inspection was limited to view from entrance. No concerns noted.
5.3  INSULATION  
Fair
5.3 (1) The flashlight in the photo is about 12 inches (30 cm) long.
5.3 (2) See Home Owner Information Guide - Insulation.
5.3 (3) No gasket was observed at the attic hatch and staining was observed around the insulation stops. Recommend weather stripping  to stop warm, moist air from leaking into the attic where moisture can condense on cold surfaces causing damage and possibly supporting mould growth.
5.4  DUCTS AND PENETRATIONS  
Fair
Rated FAIR because view obstructed by framework. No concerns were noted.

6(A) .  MAIN FLOOR BATH
6.0.A  SINK(S)  
Fair
Moderate sink surface wear or damage is generally cosmetic. If the base material has not been exposed or materially affected, the need for replacement is discretionary.
6.1.A  CABINETRY  
Fair
Older cabinets observed, typical condition for age; upgrade as desired.
6.2.A  TOILET  
Fair
Loose seat observed; recommend correction for improved safety.
6.3.A  BATHTUB  
Satisfactory
6.3.A (1) Overflow drains are prone to leakage, and because they are concealed by design, are not inspected during a standard home inspection. Housemaster assumes no responsibility for damage caused by overfilling tub.
6.4.A  SURROUND / ENCLOSURE  
Fair
Gaps and staining in caulking observed at tub rim. Maintain caulking as required.
6.5.A  FLOORING  
Fair
6.5.A (1) Cracked tiles and grout observed increasing the potential for water infiltration though the surface and water damage; recommend maintenance as required.
6.5.A (2) A moisture meter was used to check for subsurface moisture. No concerns noted.
6.6.A  WALLS / CEILING  
Fair
Stains on ceiling and rust on fixtures suggest that the ventilation fan was not used or not left on after showering. Clean and repaint surfaces as required. Generally, fans should be operated for 1/2 hour after showering. Timer switches are available for convenience.

6(B) .  ENSUITE BATH
6.1.B  CABINETRY  
Fair
Older cabinets observed, typical condition for age; upgrade as desired.
6.3.B  FLOORING  
Fair
6.3.B (1) Cracked  and loose grout observed increasing the potential for water infiltration though the surface and water damage; recommend maintenance as required.
6.6.B  ELECTRIC / GFCI  
Fair
6.6.B (1) Standard receptacle installed, recommend replacement with a GFCI type outlet for improved safety.
6.6.B (2) The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter  helps to prevent electrocution. If the GFCI circuity within the outlet detects a current leak it will shut down the receptacle and other receptacles downstream to prevent electrocution. (If the GFCI is in the panel the entire circuit will shut down.) Please note that GFCI’s are designed to protect people, not devices.

6(C) .  BASEMENT BATH
6.0.C  SINK(S)  
Fair
6.0.C (1) Reverse/poor slope at trap arm,  may contribute to blockage or backups; recommend correction as required to reduce the potential for blockage and water damage.
6.3.C  BATHTUB  
Fair
6.3.C (1) Overflow drains are prone to leakage, and because they are concealed by design, are not inspected during a standard home inspection. Housemaster assumes no responsibility for damage caused by overfilling tub.
6.3.C (2) Tub is not level. Water may remain on the tub rim in the corners, indicate by mildew on the caulking. Recommend maintaining caulking or re-set the tub as required.
6.3.C (3) Missing stopper. The inspector used a universal stopper to fill and drain tub.
6.4.C  SURROUND / ENCLOSURE  
Fair
Maintain caulking at the tub rim.

7.  KITCHEN
7.0  PLUMBING / SINK(S) / FAUCET(S)  
Fair
7.0 (1) Odour was detected from the sink drains. May disappear once regular use resumes. It may be necessary to remove and clean the p-traps.
7.0 (2) Faucet is leaking around the handle. Leakage may stop once regular use resumes. It may be possible to stop the leak by removing the handle and tightening the cap, or Faucet replacement may be required.
7.0 (3) Missing aerator on the faucet spout. Aerators prevent splashing and are readily available at home improvement stores or plumbing suppliers.
7.1  FLOORING  
Fair
Laminate flooring observed. Laminate can be especially susceptible to water damage. Clean up spills promptly and consider replacement with a more suitable material.
7.3  ELECTRICAL / GFCI  
Fair
7.3 (1) Receptacles close to sink observed, safety standards recommend GFCI receptacles,within 1.5m (5 ft) of all sinks. Recommend installation for improved safety. Dual circuits may require additional wiring for GFCI protection.  Recommend further evaluation by a licensed electrician.
7.3 (2) The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter  helps to prevent electrocution. If the GFCI circuity within the outlet detects a current leak it will shut down the receptacle and other receptacles downstream to prevent electrocution. (If the GFCI is in the panel the entire circuit will shut down.) Please note that GFCI’s are designed to protect people, not devices.
7.4  RANGE  
Fair
7.4 (1) Inspecting appliances is beyond the scope of a Standard Home Inspection, therefore, the 120 Day Limited Repair Reimbursement Guarantee does NOT cover appliances as they can fail without warning. Recommend contacting an appliance repair person should concerns exist or arise.
7.4 (2) Rated FAIR as the evaluation is limited to a visual inspection of basic overall condition. As a courtesy the inspector checked the unit for basic operation and found the burners or elements responded to controls as designed at the time of inspection. No design or heating adequacy evaluation, controls, calibration assessment or other evaluations are performed as part of a standard home inspection. The self-cleaning feature, if present, was not  tested.
7.5  DISHWASHER  
Poor/Defective
7.5 (1) Inspecting appliances is beyond the scope of a Standard Home Inspection, therefore, the 120 Day Limited Repair Reimbursement Guarantee does NOT cover appliances as they can fail without warning. Recommend contacting an appliance repair person should concerns exist or arise.
7.5 (2) Dishwasher was not functional, operating the power switch has no effect. Recommend repair by a qualified appliance repair service.
7.5 (3) The drain connection from the dishwasher is not consistent with normal practice, water will stand in the loose coil on the bottom of the cabinet and may lead to blockage or backflow; recommend that the hose be fastened as high as possible under the countertop.
7.7  CABINETRY  
Fair
Loose hinges and mis-aligned doors  observed; adjust / tighten hinges as required.
7.8  COUNTERTOP  
Fair
Inspection of countertop areas is limited to a check of readily visible surface for any major damage/installation defects. Countertops are subject to wear and abuse. All countertop surfaces should be checked when clear of storage or obstructions.
7.9  REFRIGERATOR  
Fair
7.9 (1) Inspecting appliances is beyond the scope of a Standard Home Inspection, therefore, the 120 Day Limited Repair Reimbursement Guarantee does NOT cover appliances as they can fail without warning. Recommend contacting an appliance repair person should concerns exist or arise.
7.9 (2) Rated FAIR as the evaluation is limited to a visual inspection of the basic overall condition. As a courtesy the Inspector checked the unit for basic operation and found the refrigerator to be energized and cold at the time of inspection.

8.  INTERIOR ELEMENTS
8.0  CEILINGS  
Fair
8.0 (1) Cracks, blemishes, and/or nail pops in various areas observed, typical of the age of house; recommend correction as desired. If defects are large, recurring, or appear to increase in magnitude, there is likely an underlying structural concern that may need to be addressed.
8.0 (2) Wherever surface damage exists, the extent of hidden or related damaged is not part of a standard visual home inspection and should be assessed prior to performing repair. In some cases this may mean removing the finished surfaces to check the substrate or underlying structural members.
8.0 (3) Minor cracking over doorways, windows and beams is fairly typical and does not indicate structural concerns unless cracks continue to grow. Cracks can be repaired but may reappear with time.
8.1  WALLS  
Fair
8.1 (1) Wherever surface damage exists, the extent of hidden or related damaged should be assessed prior to performing repair. In some cases this may mean removing the finished surfaces to check the substrate or underlying structural members.
8.1 (2) Cracks, blemishes, and/or nail pops in various areas observed; recommend correction as desired. If defects are large, recurring, or appear to increase in magnitude, there is likely an underlying structural concern that may need to be addressed.
8.1 (3) Minor cracking over doorways, windows and beams is fairly typical and does not indicate structural concerns unless cracks continue to grow. Cracks can be repaired but may reappear with time.
8.2  FLOORING  
Fair
8.2 (1) Wherever surface damage exists, the extent of hidden or related damaged is not part of a standard visual home inspection and should be assessed prior to performing repair. In some cases this may mean removing the finished surfaces to check the substrate or underlying structural members.
8.2 (2) Cracks, blemishes, and/or other defects observed in various areas; recommend correction as desired. If defects are large, recurring, or appear to increase in magnitude, there is likely an underlying structural concern that may need to be addressed.
8.2 (3) Creaks and/or squeaks observed, characteristic of design and/or age.
8.4  RAILINGS  
Fair
Loose railing observed at the front entry. Repair or remove as desired.
8.5  WINDOWS  
Fair
8.5 (1) Identification of not visible failed window seals is not part of a standard home inspection, seal failure is not always visible due to temperature variations. As a courtesy only, the inspector will indicate any failures visible during the inspection.
8.5 (2) An inventory of storms/screens should be taken to confirm desired coverage exists.
8.5 (3) Loose pins observed on the casement window cranks. Pins may fall out. Push or tap the pins back into position.
8.5 (4) All bedrooms and basement sleeping areas should have a window to the exterior suitable and accessible as an emergency egress, including functioning hardware, openable security bars if present, and adequate space at window wells if applicable; recommend checking with local code authorities (City of Edmonton) if any concerns are present and correction as required for improved safety.
8.5 (5) Living room window blind is not functional. Repair / replace as needed.
8.6  ROOM DOORS  
Fair
Basement bedroom door drags on carpet. Loose hinges observed. Tighten hinges. Trimming the door may be required to clear the carpet.
8.8  SMOKE DETECTOR(S)  
Not Inspected
8.8 (1) A standard home inspection does not include evaluating the adequacy of any existing security or safety system. Each owner should perform his/her own assessment of the systems installed and those that may be desired and/or required. A qualified specialist can also perform such an evaluation if desired. Smoke/Fire detection systems and fire extinguishers are generally recommended for all homes, and may be required in some areas. Fire officials recommend smoke detectors be installed inside of each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on each level of the home, including the basement, and not near the kitchen.  Detectors should be replaced periodically in accordance with manufacturers recommendations.

Replacing smoke  and CO detectors when a house changes occupancy is generally recommended. Detectors with 10 year batteries are now available. Carbon monoxide detectors are also now recommended for any home within 5 meters of bedrooms and in same room as wood burning fireplaces.

8.8 (2) New smoke detectors are provided, still in their packaging.
8.9  THERMAL IMAGING  
Satisfactory
8.9 (1) Thermal imaging is used to scan for temperature variations which can indicate possible areas of heat loss, moisture intrusion and equipment malfunction which would not otherwise be detected in a home inspection.  Images require interpretation based on understanding of heat transfer in building materials. Further investigation is usually required to confirm if defects are present.
8.9 (2) Cool areas observed above windows likely indicates settled insulation, typical of the age of the house. No easy remedy is available.

9.  FOUNDATION / SUBSTRUCTURE
9.0  FOUNDATION WALLS  
Fair
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
9.1  PIERS / COLUMNS  
Fair
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
9.2  MAIN BEAM(S)  
Fair
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
9.3  FLOOR FRAMING  
Fair
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
9.4  FLOOR SLAB  
Fair
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.

10.  FOUNDATION AREA WATER PENETRATION
10.0  EXTERIOR FEATURES / WATER INTRUSION FACTORS  
Fair
10.0 (1) All houses require maintenance of roof gutters and downspouts, ground slope at foundation and clearance of ice and snow to reduce potential for basement water penetration and foundation damage.
10.0 (2) Raised garden beds tend to be relatively flat and receive irrigation, water ponding on the surface and saturating the soil below can result in water intrusion and foundation damage. Ensure that ground surface slopes away from the house and consider plantings that require little or no irrigation.
10.0 (3) Vertical cracks in the foundation surface at one or more locations observed. Vertical cracks are not normally structural concerns; recommend sealing or repair to reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.
10.1  INTERIOR CONDITIONS / SIGNS OF WATER INTRUSION  
Fair
10.1 (1) See Home Owner Information Guide - Water Penetration.
10.1 (2) No observable signs of moisture were present at time of inspection.
10.1 (3) Fully finished basement with raised floors limits inspection; however no visible stains or other evidence of moisture observed. Controlling roof water by maintaining or installing if not present downspout extensions/splash blocks, providing positive grading, sealing/repairing any foundation cracks/perforations, and ensuring proper operation/maintenance of sump pump and window wells (where applicable) will reduce potential for water infiltration.
10.1 (4) Most houses have the potential for surface or subsurface water penetration. Regardless of any specific report comments, it would be prudent in all cases to discuss local conditions and concerns with the present owner and local authorities. Any comments made in this report are based on evidence/indication present at the time of inspection only. It is not possible to accurately determine the extent of past conditions or to predict future concerns. If there are indications of prior remedial work intended to reduce water penetration concerns, documentation should be obtained from the owner and/or installer. Experience indicates that the majority of water penetration concerns are due to a combination of factors commonly related to inadequate foundation grading and drainage provisions. In many situations, relatively straightforward measures may have a direct effect on the condition; in other cases, a remedy may be more complex or impossible to achieve. Any specific recommendations in the report should be considered; however, be aware that they do not necessarily represent a complete or permanent solution to the condition.
10.2  SUMP PUMP(S)  
Not Applicable
None installed observed; recommend consider installing a sump to help control ground water under the basement floor and reduce the potential for water infiltration and damage.

11.  ELECTRIC SYSTEM
11.1  SERVICE GROUNDING PROVISIONS  
Not Inspected
11.1 (1) Grounding wire visible at panel and water pipes but unable to trace due to finish materials.
11.1 (2) Grounding wires do not normally carry electric current. They provide a low-resistance path to ground if metal parts of the house that should not carry current become energized.
11.3  DISTRIBUTION PANEL(S)  
Poor/Defective
11.3 (1) The upper cover on the distribution panel is missing. This is a serious hazard as contact with live high-amperage wires will result in electrocution. Recommend correction by a licensed electrician.
11.3 (2) Recommend tracing, confirming correct labeling, and/or additional labeling of all circuits for improved safety.
11.3 (3) See Home Owner Information Guide - Common Electrical Concerns.
11.3 (4) Improper screws for panel cover, not blunt-ended which could damage wire insulation observed; recommend replacement with approved panel screws and/or recommend further evaluation by a licensed electrician and correction as required.
11.3 (5) Open knock-out observed presenting risk of electric shock if object is inserted. Knockout plugs are recommended for safety.
11.4  SUBPANEL GARAGE  
Fair
11.4 (1) Open space(s) in panel cover observed; recommending adding proper blanking cover(s) for improved safety.
11.4 (2) Improper pointed cover screw observed, may pierce wire insulation creating a shock hazard. Recommend replacement with proper blunt screw.
11.5  DEVICES  
Fair
11.5 (1) Cracked cover plate is caused by over-tightening the screws. There may be others.
11.5 (2) Wires not properly secured in light fixture in the utility room. Recommend further investigation and correction as required.
11.6  WIRING / CONDUCTORS  
Fair
11.6 (1) Inspected where visible only, house design and finished areas obscures components and limits visible inspection of all components.
11.6 (2) Aluminum wires observed on some circuits. Aluminum 120V wiring is an ongoing maintenance concern.  Connections must be clean and tight and only devices that are suitable for aluminum wire should be used. In most cases 'pig-tailing' is an acceptable correction and can be done by a licensed electrician.  Recommended that houses with aluminum wiring on the household circuits be checked by an licensed electrician to confirm acceptability of all connections and to determine if any remedial measures are required. Actions/methods required will vary among electricians and agencies involved with electric safety. If possible, ask the current owner if remedial work has been performed.  If prior remedial work is indicated, recommend obtaining documentation that the remedial work was done to proper standards. Recommend checking with Insurance Company and Lending Company as to insurability and acceptability. See Home Owner Information Guide - Aluminum Wiring.
11.7  GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER(S)  
Satisfactory
11.7 (2) Inspected where installed; recommend that they be installed in all high hazard areas, e.g. bathrooms, garages, kitchens, laundry room and exteriors.  Recommend a licensed electrician assess the need and appropriate locations for GFCIs and correct as required.
11.8  ARC FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER(S)  
Not Applicable
No Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters were observed. Consider installing AFCI's  for improved safety. AFCI's can prevent fires by stopping flow of electrical current, if arcing, due to loose or worn connections is detected. In 2015 the Canadian Electrical Code was updated to include AFCI's on most types of outlets in residential homes excluding sump pumps and other various types of receptacles. Consider upgrading. A licensed electrician can advise on appropriate locations for AFCI's.

12.  HEATING SYSTEM
12.0  HEATING UNIT(S)  
Fair
12.0 (1) Rated FAIR because although the unit was functional at the time of inspection furnaces over 5 years old have a higher probability of requiring repairs or other remedial work. More stringent maintenance and servicing routines are required to keep furnaces running well throughout their design life. Lack of preventative maintenance and regular servicing are the leading causes of furnace repairs and premature failure for models of this age.
12.0 (2) Carbon monoxide level was normal. This does not guarantee there are no heat exchanger perforations. Recommend use of CO detectors within 5 meters of all bedrooms. Maximum CO concentration for a continuous 8 hour exposure (OSHA) is 25 ppm. See Home Owner Information Guide - Carbon Monoxide.
12.0 (3) System design obscures some components and were Inspected where visible only.
12.0 (4) See Home Owner Information Guide - Warm Air Heating.
12.0 (5) The inspection of the Furnace is limited to a visual inspection and a basic evaluation of the overall unit. Due to normal design constraints the heat exchangers, control board, system ignitors, flame sensors and pressure switches cannot be assessed within the scope of a standard inspection and are NOT covered by the HouseMaster Guarantee. Flame sensors and igniters are considered high maintenance items and require regular cleaning and eventual replacement. Independent evaluation by an HVAC specialist is highly advised, as well as adhering to a regular maintenance and servicing routine as per the manufacturer's recommendations.
12.4  COMBUSTION AIR PROVISIONS  
Poor/Defective
The combustion air duct has been disconnected, the exterior air intake is connected to the clothes dryer duct.This can affect furnace operation as well as create potential carbon monoxide hazards; recommend restoring the combustion air duct and removing the duct tape blocking the anti-draft pot.
12.7  DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM  
Fair
12.7 (1) Add-on components or systems (electronic air cleaners, humidifiers, water treatment systems, etc.) are not evaluated as part of a standard home inspection unless specifically indicated.
12.7 (2) Inspected where visible only, finished areas obscures components and limits visible inspection of all components.
12.7 (3) Humidifiers require regular cleaning and maintenance. Humidifiers, if used, should be set for 30% to 50%  relative humidity (RH) for human comfort. RH above 60 % can support mould growth.
12.8  THERMOSTAT(S)  
Not Inspected
12.8 (1) Evaluation is limited to physical condition, mounting methods, and basic response to set point adjustment for heating system operation. No assessment of calibration accuracy, response time, effectiveness, or the function of features or components are performed as part of a standard home inspection.
12.8 (2) Thermostat not securely mounted level on the wall observed which may effect calibration; recommend correction as required.
12.9  ADDITIONAL COMMENTS  
Poor/Defective
A plug and receptacle is used for a service disconnect, and the plug wires are exposed and not secured. Recommend that a proper disconnect switch be installed for safety.

13.  PLUMBING SYSTEM
13.0  WATER SUPPLY PIPING  
Fair
13.0 (1) Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
13.0 (2) See Home Owner Information Guide - Common Plumbing Concerns.
13.0 (3) Water shut-offs are not exercised during inspection. Consider exercising shut-off valves annually. Valves that are stuck or leak should be repaired or replaced.
13.0 (4) The solder used to join copper pipes and fittings prior to the late 1980's may contain lead. Its use was discontinued due to health concerns. Municipal water suppliers adjust water chemistry to minimize corrosion of piping and  lead in the water.  Residential users can further minimize exposure by running the water for a few minutes each morning and using a filter.  Recommend Health Canada's Minimizing Exposure to Lead from Drinking Water Distribution Systems for more information.
13.2  DRAIN / WASTE PIPING  
Fair
Rated FAIR as not all areas are visible or accessible for inspection due to finishing and design. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed professional if concerns are present or arise.
13.4  GAS PIPING  
Fair
Inspected where visible only, house design and finished areas obscures components and limits visible inspection of all components. Accessible joints and fittings were checked for leaks with a combustible gases meter.
13.5  LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT  
Not Inspected
13.5 (1) Neither the laundry equipment, the utility hook-ups (water, electric and gas), nor venting and waste lines for any particular appliance are evaluated as part of a standard inspection. Personal concerns related to any laundry equipment or hook-up needs of new equipment should be assessed by a qualified tradesman. These appliances are not inspected and not covered under the HouseMaster Guarantee.
13.5 (2) See comment in Section 12.4 above.

14.  WATER HEATER(S)
14.0  WATER HEATER(S)  
Satisfactory
Flammable Vapor Ignition Resistant type of unit observed. No access to combustion chamber present; no inspection was possible or performed. These type of units have metal mesh on the combustion air intake. There is potential for the intake to plug with debris such as lint, dust, etc; recommend cleaning air intake area periodically. Some units have a reset, however most units have a fuseable link on the thermocouple that must be replaced if unit shuts down due to poor intake air flow.
14.3  COMBUSTION AIR PROVISIONS  
Poor/Defective
See comment in 12.4 above.
14.4  SAFETY VALVE PROVISIONS  
Satisfactory
Water heater relief valves are not exercised during a standard inspection. Exercising the relief valve is a maintenance task requiring monitoring afterward for leakage.  Refer to manufacturer's recommendations for maintenance requirements.


Prepared Using HomeGauge http://www.HomeGauge.com : Licensed To Paul Dolynny
 
 

PAUL DOLYNNY,
INSPECTOR
780-449-3883
bookedmonton@housemaster.ca

PAUL DOLYNNY,
INSPECTOR
780-449-3883
bookedmonton@housemaster.ca